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W’s Post Scripts: Like Peter, find, declare and express the unfettered nature of the Christ! (1)
Insights from Cobbey Crisler and Ken Cooper on select citations for
“Ancient and Modern Necromancy, alias Mesmerism and Hypnotism, Denounced”
for June 2, 2019


Happy Memorial Day!! Click here daily to listen to short CedarS Practitioner Talk(s) given after breakfast nearly every morning going forward (and backward to 2006)!
Today’s “Prac Talk” (May 27, 2019) was delivered by John Biggs, C.S.


Warren’s (W’s) PS#1 Ken Cooper wrote a backstory narrative about Peter’s recognition of Jesus as the Christ ((Matthew 16: 13-18, B22). You can and this week’s online Post Scripts which are both always available to browse by author and year at CedarS Metaphysical website.]

Ken writes: When we follow the Christ, – our true nature, we are led as was Peter to build the church both in our lives and that of others. We each have our unique place in God’s infinite manifestation of His perfection, and that place is loved and protected, for anything unlike God is simply outside of infinite Mind and therefore cannot exist, has no power, claim, is nothing at all.

The monologue this week is that of Peter being led to declare the nature of Christ, the role of Jesus in the demonstration of Christ and his own role (and ours) in its unfettered expression. When we follow Christ, we have the invincible strength of almighty God with us, and we stand on rock eternal

The monologue is given by Peter as he is drawn to understand the true nature of Christ and his own role as directed by Jesus – “Upon this rock I will build my church..”

The narration is https://youtu.be/9DVUHtTQ2mo, while pdf copies are attached in color and B&W


W’s PS#2—Cobbey Crisler on Acts 10:38 (B14) and surrounding verses in context
“Acts 10, verse 34, begins a lecture or sermon to the first group of Gentiles. And the opening statement that Peter makes is one that could be well considered by every denomination of Christianity todayHere Peter expressed his new view of God, that God is no respecter of persons, that God speaks to receptivity.

Acts 10:34  Then Peter opened his mouth, and said, Of a truth I perceive that God is no respecter of persons:

This new view of God, of course, leads to this next question: Should man as well be no respecter of persons? This is a tradition-shattering concept.

And Acts 10, verse 35, Peter summarizes it by saying in every nation he that feareth him, and worketh righteousness, is accepted with him.

Then he begins to explain to Cornelius and the friends and acquaintances of Cornelius, the history of early Christianity. “The beginning of Christianity is traced from Galilee after John’s baptism, how God anointed Jesus of Nazareth.” … Of course, that word “anointed” immediately identifies Jesus as the Messiah. This is a point that Peter is obviously going to get across to this Gentile audience that would need some instruction in this. (See below, paraphrased)

Acts 10:38 How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him.

And you find in Acts 10, verse 43, he does that by stating that “all the prophets had given witness to the Messiah, namely Jesus.”…

As soon as Peter gets into this “Walked to Emmaus” approach, in other words the comprehension of Jesus’ role in the earlier scripture, we find in Acts 10, verse 44 that “the Holy Ghost falls on all the listeners.” …

It wasn’t Peter’s idea that this should happen; it’s at the Holy Ghost’s initiative. This is disturbing to some of those that came with Peter: Jewish Christians.
And we will find it becomes even more disturbing to other elements in the church later on, for this is a departure. The question underlying this event is “Should the church be parochial or universal?” Is it simply a sect of Judaism or an outcome of Judaism, or is it the fulfillment of God’s will as expressed in prophecy with its ultimate mission to embrace universal humanity?”

After the Master What? – The Book of Acts,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#3 – Cobbey Crisler on Matthew 12:22-28 (B15)

“Matthew 12: (Verse 22) “Now we have someone brought possessed with a devil and healed."

(Verse 25). Jesus talks about "a kingdom divided against itself “ which we have already discussed.

(Verse 26). "How could he use Satan to cast out Satan?"

(Verse 29). He makes a very interesting parallel in referring to a strong man's house. "To enter into a house, and spoil the goods, you have to really render the strong man powerless."

To do this means giving priority to the strong man before you begin to mess around in his house. Then the strong man would resist the healing. Was it mentality arrayed against the possibility, both in the environment and in that man? Did Jesus bind that mental resistance first, and then heal the case?”
“Book of Matthew, Auditing the Master: A Tax-Collectors Report,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#4—Cobbey Crisler on Matthew 16: 13-23 (B22) Peter declares Jesus as Messiah:
Verse 13 of Matthew 16 has a very important question that Jesus raises himself. He says, Whom do men say that I, the Son of man, am?" Do you think he was interested in the answer? He wouldn't have raised the question otherwise.

(Verse 14). He gets the answer right away. They all say he’s some old prophet reincarnated. You can almost take your choice of prophets.

(Verse 15). Putting ide the general point of view, the average point of view, he says."But whom do you, my immediate students, say that I am?"

(Verse 16). Peter, once again, raises his hand, and says, "You are the Chris the Son of the living God.”

Remember what that would mean to a first century Jew. You are the Christ." The Christ was the Greek translation of the Hebrew word Messiah. “You are the Messiah.” Where do you find the

Messiah? In the Old Testament. "You are the Old Testament prophesied Messiah." Was Jesus pleased with that answer? Yes.

(Verse 17)."He said, Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona." He says two specific things. One, "That he didn't get that because a human had given it to him. He had gotten it directly from God." Jesus considered that he was prophesied about in Scripture.

(Verse 18). The second point is "that on that rock he would build his church." It is interesting the use of the two Greek words for "rock" there. Petros in Greek is "rock." But it's not the real Greek word for "rock." It's kind of a nickname. The Greek word is petra which is feminine. Petros is masculine. It shows that the church is founded on petra which is the bedrock and it has a feminine context. Petros, Peter, is like a chip off the rock. Petros in Greek is almost the equivalent of "rocky" in English. It's a nickname. The church is founded on the bedrock, or petra. What bedrock is he talking about?

Peter has just said, that he has recognized that Jesus was prophesied in the Old Testament. Is that important to the church? Because this is the first time Jesus ever mentions the word "church." He was probably waiting until the receptivity among his hearers warranted its mention. That receptivity would not be proved until whatever is necessary to be seen was introduced into the conversation. Peter apparently brings in that necessary ingredient by saying, "You are the prophesied Messiah." In effect, you are not a temporary phenomenon. You were appointed by God to do your job.

But what exactly does Peter mean by "your job?" Every Jewish child was brought up on the Scriptures. Brought up to consider that the Messiah was to come. But what kind of Messiah? What kind of Messiah did they expect?

The Jews expected a king, a political leader. How about a Messiah who would suffer and end up on a cross? I think about as accurate as we can be on the subject from this vantage point in the twentieth century is to give you an example. For instance, we even have modem Jewish scholars today writing things like this. "In Jewish Messianic thought of the Targum (a book or division of the Old Testament in Aramaic), there is no room whatsoever for a suffering and dying Messiah."

The Jewish Encyclopaedia reads on this same subject, "The Messiah was expected to attain for Israel the idyllic blessings of the prophet. He was to defeat the enemies of Israel, restore the people to the land, reconcile them with God, and introduce a period of spiritual and physical bliss. He was to be prophet, warrior, judge, king, and teacher of Torah (the Pentateuch). The early sources do not mention a suffering Messiah. How did Jesus look on the cross to a Jewish nation that had been brought up to regard a Messiah who would be victorious over eve0thing, not be crucified as a criminal."

So, you can see what Jesus was faced with on the cross. That was a pretty lonely position, among other things. Understanding who Jesus was to become is the one obstacle between Jesus and the formation of his church. So, for the first time, when Peter says, "You're the Messiah," it looks good as far as the progress of the church is concerned. But, let's analyze what goes on and discover what Peter meant by that.

(Verse 21). Notice, right after Peter says, "You're the Messiah," Jesus tells his disciples for the first time what? "That he must go unto Jerusalem, suffer, be killed, and be raised again the third day."

How did that look for what they had been brought up to regard as the Messianic fulfillment?

(Verse 22). Not very good, not even to Peter. "Peter rebuked Jesus and said, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall not be unto thee."

Peter has just taken a good portion of Scriptural prophecy and run the vacuum cleaner over it. What did Jesus have to say?

(Verse 23). Here's the same man that had said (in Matthew 16:18) "Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church." now saying, "You are an offence unto me: Get thee behind me, Satan, for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but those that be of men." That's the very opposite of what he just said before.

It's what Peter said that represented the rock upon which the church would be built in the first instance. It's what Peter said in the second instance that was Satan's attempt to distort and discount Scriptural prophecy.

So, perhaps, the greatest threat facing the church is the attempt to distort the role of its founder in Scriptural prophecy and the role of the church itself in the fulfillment of Scriptural prophesy. Because when Jesus says to Peter, "Thou art an offence unto me," that Greek word "offence" is skandalon, or our scandal. But it also has a meaning in Greek of "stumbling block." Do you see the play on words again? Peter was called petros, which was identified with the rock, only so long as he identified himself with the rock. When he did not, the rock became a stumbling block instead.”
Book of Matthew, Auditing the Master: A Tax Collector’s Report, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


**You can buy your own transcripts of most of Cobbey Crisler’s 28 talks at this website: www.crislerlibrary.co.uk Email your order or inquiry to office@crislerlibrary.co.uk, or directly to Janet Crisler, at janetcrisler7@gmail.com

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