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Apply Bible G.E.M.s to help you quickly change from the death channel!
Let your G.E.M.s (of God Expressed Meekly/Mightily in you) sparkle with insights
from Cobbey Crisler, Ken Cooper & others as found in The Christian Science Bible Lesson on

Probation After Death
[or Turn-around Tests After the seeming Death
of Norms for Health, Collective Activities & Employment]

for April 26, 2020


Global Prayer Watch GEMs: “… in response to the coronavirus pandemicclick here
to enjoy an uplifting collection of “Daily Lifts”
featured on the ChristianScience.com website.

[Also, available with a click here is a timely, inspiring, & encouraging "Prac Talk" offered as a 2-minute video by this week's CedarS Met contributor, Kathy Fitzer, CS. Other short, timely and inspiring "Prac Talks" also come up to be enjoyed after Kathy’s.]


Apply GEM #1: “Fear not…” because of God promise “…I am with thee” as a Sunday School student proved.

Cobbey Crisler insights on Job 3: 25 (Responsive Reading)
Job 3:25. Job says the very well-known statement, one of the most well-known in the entire Bible, “the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me.” The Hebrew literally is this, “I feared a fear and it came upon me.” The second part of the verse repeats it because it’s poetry (of thoughts that rhyme), “and that which I was afraid of is come unto me.” Look at the revelation, if we can use that word here about the nature of fear that we have. Had we already identified fear in Job’s thought earlier? (Voice: “Yes.”) Why did he get up every morning and go through that (ritual in Job 1:5 of offering burnt offerings for his children)? He says, the thing I greatly feared,” way behind, suppressed very deeply.

He was just keeping ahead of that fear through his religion. Nothing happened, and therefore he was very religious. Now everything is blown sky high. What’s going to happen to his religion?

What about this fear? What effect did it have? He saying, “the thing which I have greatly feared.” What is its relationship to the fear itself?

(Sound of writing on the chalkboard) Here is the fear. And here is the thing we fear. Resting in the thought of everyone, especially today, with so many things that seem to be happening unexpectedly.
Is that all accumulating in the form of suppressed fear? Look at what Job says happens. What is the relationship between the fear and the thing? (Voice: “Attraction.”) It is, isn’t it? In other words, this thing heads in the direction of the fear. It’s magnetic.

If we understand that to be true about the quality of fear in thought, would anyone be afraid again? Would anyone in his right mind want to be afraid again? If we that all that fear was doing, was attracting the thing that we were afraid of, right to us? Just think of the disservice so many Hollywood movies do, if this is correct. Also, ask yourself, if it is a coincidence, that right after we see certain movies, that we suddenly find the same disasters are occurring? [As in a recent movie about a virus attacking global humanity…] The focus is human thought!

This is one of the most beautiful exposures of the nature of this to-and-fro evil to attack humanity. Our effort must be to break that magnetism so that the thing feared cannot come to man individually or collectively, because there’s nothing in thought to attract it.

The textbook gives us the solution to fear, the textbook of the Bible. Because I John (4:18) gives us the solution to fear. What is it? “Perfect Love castest out fear:” What kind of love? It’s got to be perfect, not a chink in the armor. Is that stating to us that only in thought is a complete defense, or panoply (a complete suit of armor), with the threat of something that otherwise would be fearsome indeed?

One of my Sunday School students once had the rest of the class on the edges of their chairs as a result of an experience she had just that week. It illustrates this. She was walking home very late at night after an extension course at a local college in a very poor area of town, not lit very well. As she was walking through suddenly she heard a car behind her. It squealed its brakes, stopped at the curb, and out jumped four leather-jacketed “gentlemen.” They ran right towards her, grabbed her, and started dragging her into the nearby woods.

Here comes the big question, like it came from Noah, like it came for Daniel, like it came for Job. Here it is still a question mark in her thought. That girl had been used to studying the Bible. She was pretty good with it theoretically. Here came an opportunity to see if it had any practical value. Of course, you don’t think too intellectually at times like that. She said to the class that all that came to her was something she hadn’t even recognized was from the Bible. She never even remembered reading it. It was (from Isaiah 43:5) “Fear not, for I am with you.” She kept shouting that at the top of her lungs, “Fear not, for I am with you.”

Here was a mob scene. Something in the human nature of one of those boys was touched by that higher sense, because it broke the mob up slightly. He said, “Hey, wait a minute, let’s let her alone. She’s not that kind of a girl.” That brief stopping of what looked like the inevitable was sufficient for a car, just coming around to catch the scene in its headlights. It was a police car. The boys dropped her fast, got into their car and took off. The policemen, sizing it up quickly, stopped, went over to this gal and picked her up and said, “Would you like a ride home? Are you alright?” She said, “Yes, thank you very much.” She rode in the car with the policemen back to her house and the driver said, “You know, little lady, how lucky you are. This isn’t our regular beat. Our beat’s one block up from here. But my buddy said, ‘Hey, tonight, why don’t we just go down and check that area?’ So, I agreed, and we went.”

That gal, in really reaching out for the only possible help—there was no human help — had apparently touched the solution for her experience that could be the solution for all of us. What needed to be counteracted in thought was fear, because look what came to her, “Fear not!” Why? The textbook answer, “For I am with thee.” Just that mustard seed was able to counteract what would have been the magnetic attraction to the thing she greatly feared. It was also apparently enough to, not only reach the thought of one boy, but perhaps even to alert the policemen to an idea that they had not contemplated on the previous night.

And everything arrived at once. You can imagine what that meant to the kids when they heard that in Sunday School – and to me as well. I’ve always kind of taken it as a beautiful example of what Job is saying here in revealing the nature of fear.

There’s a movie ad I read not too recently showing that we’re almost gluttons for punishment as far as human nature is concerned. That movie ad—maybe you’ve seen it—it promises audiences in big, bold headlines, “AT LAST—TOTAL TERROR!” (Laughter) Who wants total terror? But people are paying money for it! When they leave that theater, what’s dancing on their eyelids and their mental memory as far as these things are concerned? What does a knock on the door, or a scream in the night, or anything else now mean in terms of the helplessness of man and of man shoved back into no-dominion-at-all, but fatalistically waiting for what comes?” [from the corona virus “beast”]
“The Case of Job,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


Polish GEM #2: Reach out to feel God’s presence, even if circumstances seem to have thrown you down to the depths of hell!

"Whither Shall I Go from Thy Spirit" from Psalm 139:7, 8 (B3) comforts us with assurance of the uplifting ever-presence of Spirit. We can sing together of this in Hymn 599, "Whither Shall I Go from Thy Spirit", in the 2017 Christian Science Hymnal.

This psalm is a favorite song at several camps and is especially lovely when sung with the descant. You can hear another version of it (and buy a 50th Anniversary trilogy of CedarS CDs all for $25 to go totally to camperships) at http://blog.cedarscamps.org/2011/07/16/order-around-the-clock-a-collection-of-3-cds-with-camp-songs-you-love-created-just-for-cedars/


Apply Prayer Watch GEM #3: Pray with powerful gratitude-in-advance like did Jesus when he raised Lazarus!

Cobbey Crisler on John 11:1-15 (B8) and 11:18-44 (B9) (Plus Science & Health 75:13 (S18)
In Chapter 11, note how Jesus handles news of a severe sickness.

In John 11:3, "Jesus gets a message from Lazarus' sisters that Lazarus is sick."

In John 11:4, the first thing Jesus says is, "This sickness is not unto death.”

Remember that's what he said about the man born blind in John 9:3, " Neither has this man sinned, nor his parents: but that the works of God might be manifest in him." We find the same kind of approach to a patient with Jesus' method of healing including that concept.

John 11:5, "He loved the family very much, the family of Bethany,”

John 11:6, "But he still remains for two days."

Then in John 11:7, he says, "Let us go into Judea again.”

John 11:8, "His disciples say, What? Last time we were there we had to duck projectiles."

Then in John 11:11, he says to the disciples, “Our friend . . . (see the shepherd­motive) Lazarus sleepeth; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep." There are two Greek words for sleeping here. The first one is as if taking rest in sleep. The second one, "awake him out of sleep," is the Greek word "exhyp,nos”. It includes within it the root of our word hypnotism. It has a suggestion of a trance-like, not­normally-induced sleep. It is interesting to see Jesus referring to death as a process of needing to be awakened from a trance.

John 11:12. His disciples misunderstand that whole thing and "they say, If he’s sleeping, leave him alone. He’s fine if he’s resting."

John 11:13 shows how Jesus was using what we would call a euphemism. He avoided the word die, because he is seeing it differently.

In John 11:14, when, "they don't comprehend him, he says very plainly, Lazarus is dead ."

John 11:16. Thomas doesn’t cover himself with glory every time he appears in the Scriptures. On the other hand, neither do we in our daily lives very often. I don't think we should finger-point at Thomas. But Thomas does have somewhat of a note of sarcasm here when he says to his fellow disciples, "Alright, let's go with him. Let's go die with him if he's going to Judea. " This was something he was not that willing to do when the opportunity arose. As you recall, when they captured Jesus in Gethsemane, where did Thomas head with all the rest of them?

John 11:17, "When Jesus arrives, we find that four days Lazarus had been in the tomb." He sees the scene that was so often associated with death, the hired mourners and the official mourners.

Martha appears in what I hope will always be a new light. We have a tendency to stereotype, even people we haven't known. Martha has been labeled for centuries, "Don't be a Martha." Some people are sorry their name is Martha, because of that.

In John 11:25, it is only to Martha that Jesus ever makes the statement, "I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live." Since we know that Jesus only addressed the receptive thought, and since Martha is the only one to whom he felt free to say, "I am the resurrection," it is somewhat of an honor to be named Martha from that point of view. …

John 11:33, "shows the weeping and the groaning that's going on."

John 11:35 is the shortest verse in the Bible. It indicates Jesus' humanity, "Jesus wept."

John 11:36, "Behold how he loved him!"

John 11:37, "They asked, Could this man have prevented this incident?"

John 11:38, "Jesus comes to the cave."

John 11:39, "And says, Take ye away the stone. At that point even Martha's faith breaks down. It's a hot country and a body in a tomb for four days and she so states."

John 11:40, "Jesus," supporting her continuing faith, "said, Didn't I tell you that if you would believe, you would see the glory of God?" Thereby he continued to support the resurrection trust in womanhood.

John 11:41, "They took away the stone. Jesus lifts up his eyes, and makes a pronouncement that what he desires through prayer has already been accomplished. I thank thee that thou hast heard me."

John 11:42, "And I knew that thou hearest me always. That's a remarkable statement of Jesus' theology.

Here's what the Anchor Bible says: "The prayer of petition is not the only form of prayer. If prayer is a form of union with God, then the Johannine (John's Gospel) Jesus is always praying, for he and the Father are one."

1 John 5:14 is another work attributed to the beloved disciple and one of the most beautiful views and definitions of prayer. It comes through the transparency of this thought that was so close to Jesus. Check your prayer against this measurement.

Here is the "Bureau of Standards" on prayer, "This is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask any thing according to his will, he heareth us." Notice the qualification. It is not according to our will. It is totally selfless.

1 John 5:15. But that's not all, "If we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have the petitions that we desired of him.” That's prayer of affirmation coming through there.

In John 11:42, isn't that exactly what Jesus said, "I know that thou hearest me always. If we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have the petitions. “It is important to examine how our prayers measure against that standard. We also find Jesus expressing gratitude before the event.

John 11:43. Then he says, “Lazarus, come forth." Obviously, he wouldn’t yell if he didn't think Lazarus could hear. You notice he's communicating with a so-called dead man, expecting him to be able to hear, using one of the faculties that was supposedly shut off. At the point of death, he doesn't regard it as shut off.

John 11:44, "Lazarus comes forth,” very awkwardly, I may add, but nothing could keep him from answering that demand. As a matter of fact, if you have been through the traditional tomb of Lazarus in Bethany, I consider it much more of a miracle that he ever emerged from the tomb, let alone being raised from the dead. I’m quite sure he would have bumped his head several times on his way out.

There's another part of the healing that’s necessary. "Jesus turns to those around him, “the environment, holding him in this grave, "and says, ‘Loose him, and let him go.'" There is a sense of freedom which is so important. Remember what he says to a woman in another gospel, Luke 13:12, "Woman, thou art loosed from thine infirmity.”
“The Book of John, the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


Polish GEM #4: To never see the tomb as the end, see origin as not from the womb, but from above, like Jesus did..

Cobbey Crisler on John 8: 51, 58 (B10)
“In John 8:51 Jesus said, If a man keeps my saying, he will never see death.’
An unusual statement because certainly his disciples went on and saw the death process happening all around them. So once again, what does Jesus mean? What is the intent? What is the meaning? Dodd says it's such a strong statement that it really excludes the possibility of ceasing to live. That there is an eternality to it. How would you feel that was intended? "If a man keep my saying, he shall never see death."

Take the raising of Tabitha or Dorcas. Peter went in there. Everyone else around there saw death. Was it helping the situation? Did it solve the problem called death? Peter must have gone in there with a radically different point of view. And did it have a radically different result?

The statement in John 8:58 really started a popular commotion. Jesus says, "Before Abraham was, I am.” Does that fit into his statement about, "no man ascendeth up to heaven save he that has come down from heaven, even the son of man that is in heaven?” Is there a beginning for man, divinely speaking? Does it hold within it the key of eliminating the last enemy called death?

“Book of John: A Walk with the Beloved Disciple” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


Polish GEM #5: Radiate your undying identity that’s forever loved and blessed by your heavenly Daddy (Abba)!

Cobbey Crisler on Matthew 17.1-9 (B11) and Jesus, Moses & Elias on the Mt. of Transfiguration
“Chapter 17: There is a renewed opportunity for the disciples, three of them at least, to witness who Jesus was.

(Verse 1). "Peter, James, and John come to a high mountain apart,"
(Verse 2). "He was transfigured: his face did shine,"

(Verse 3). And there is a breakthrough here because "we find Moses and Elijah talking with Jesus." What is special about that is Moses really is the prime figure in the law, isn't he? Elias is the prime figure in the prophets. So, in a way, it represents the three major sections of the Bible, long before it was sewn together in the backbone of a book.

We know what they were talking about, at least. The gospel of Luke (9:31) is the only one which tells us what the subject of conversation was on the Mount of Transfiguration. Luke tells us that they were discussing his "decease" which was forthcoming in Jerusalem. When J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904-67, U.S. nuclear physicist) wanted to talk with someone on his level, he probably wouldn't give us a call. He'd go to look for Einstein.

If Jesus were approaching his meeting with the last enemy known as death, just look at Moses and Elias. What had Elias or Elijah accomplished? He had ascended, according to the Old Testament report 2 Kings 2:11. What about Moses? It doesn't say exactly, but they never could find his body. They sent out expedition after expedition that came up empty handed. In fact, there is the intertestamental (the period between the close of the OLD TESTAMENT and the beginning of the NEW TESTAMENT) literature written called "The Assumption of Moses" where it has long been held in Jewish tradition that Moses had ascended. There is this common point of unity among those three men on that mountain.

Verse 9 (of Matthew 17). Our translation says, "Tell the vision to no man, until the Son of man be risen again from the dead." I can't find a Greek version that supports the word "again." But if it is genuine, it implies that, in effect, Jesus had to rise from the dead to communicate to these men. He had to have overcome the death barrier.

The three disciples didn't communicate with them, but they knew who they were. Isn't that interesting? That says something about identity, our identity. The identity of Moses and Elias was apparently communicable. But there was no discussion back and forth between Peter, James, and John and those on the mountain. It's sort of like television, isn't it? You can tune in at a distance. You can see people on the screen who are thousands of miles from you. Maybe even bouncing off satellites. But you can't communicate with them. Distance and time have been overcome and we can see but not communicate.

(Verse 4). They were bored there, Peter, James, and John. Peter tries to interrupt. Peter liked to feel busy. On the top of the mountain Jesus, Moses, and Elias had their thing going. So, he said, "It's good for us to be here." Really, the transfiguration didn't need Peter's endorsement. But he gave it. He said, 'It's good for us to be here. While you're up there, why don't we do something down here, instead of just sitting. We can build three tabernacles, one for thee, one for Moses, and one for Elias."

Verse 5 is when the announcement comes once again very much like the baptism (Matthew 3:17) which is rooted in prophecy. “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye him.”
“Book of Matthew, Auditing the Master: A Tax-Collectors Report,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


Polish GEM #6: Hear Peter’s imagined monologue when he shares the transfiguration with the other disciples! Feel Peter’s rallying cry to “Go forth!” at: https://youtu.be/paFN7lr9CJ4

[Of this monologue after the transfiguration Ken Cooper wrote:] The transfiguration is one of the key stories in the New Testament. The coming together of past, present and future, in the recognition that man is right now the beloved son of God, and that Love is naturally pleased with what Love creates. Peter, James and John were told not to share the story until Jesus had risen, – to let its message dwell in their hearts until its full meaning was clear, and could be shared with the understanding. Before the resurrection, the other disciples would have disbelieved. Probation is learning to listen, waiting on Love to guide us. Then, the way opens up, and the power of the Christ is made plain. Since the transfiguration, the disciples all witnessed the healing of four-days-dead Lazarus! Yet Jesus knew Lazarus' life was always present. With thanks, he simply said “Come forth”. This is what we hear and do when demonstration is fulfilled.

In the imagined monologue Peter is at last sharing the transfiguration with the other disciples, and the rallying cry is not just to “Come forth” but to “Go forth!” It ends “Jesus shone. So, must we.” It is indeed a rallying cry for these times.

Also given is a link to a poem on God’s Statement “This Is My Beloved Son” a ringing endorsement for everyone https://youtu.be/ih9iIfKSeYw

Where we look is where we go. Knowing we are loved by God will bring that love into our experience and shine.

For the words click on the links in the upper right of CedarS webpage under Downloads.

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