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W’s Post Scripts: Know as Spirit knows! (2) In advance of others demonstrate it! (3)
“Find herein a ‘canny’ crumb” (Mis. xi) or insight from Cobbey Crisler or another on citations for
Spirit
the Christian Science Bible Lesson for August 5-11, 2019


In advance of CedarS normal Metaphysical Application ideas (due to arrive soon) for this week’s Christian Science Bible Lesson, I’m sending this email of spiritual sense application ideas from Cobbey Crisler and others on several citations in hopes that that you “find herein a ‘canny’ crumb… (to) become footsteps to joys eternal.” (Miscellaneous Writings, xi:15.)


Warren’s (W’s) PS#1 Cobbey Crisler on Luke 1, Verses 46-47 (GT, B21 in King James Version):
“Mary begins in Verse 46 what the Latin Church refers to as the “Magnificat.” Let’s study some of those words. Mary said, “My soul doth magnify the Lord.” That word “soul” in the Hebrew is very close to our word “identity.” In this case we find that Mary is discussing her being as if it were a lens for God, a magnifying lens. What a beautiful way to describe identity. Would that we ourselves could look through our identity, and every time we did, we only saw the magnification of God and all the qualities associated with the divine nature, increasing more and more as the lens magnifies…”
“Luke the Researcher,” B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#2—Psalm 4:6 (B1): the healing light of seeing God face to face
“The treatment in Psalms 4, verse 6 is the “light of God’s countenance.” Despite the fact that in verse 6 the question is raised, the prognosis, we might say, which is very ill-boding, says, “Who will show us [any] good?” What’s the use? (Intimated.) Why is God’s countenance a medicine? “The light of God’s countenance.” We find this all the time that we are to seek God’s face, face-to-face. You know what Paul says face-to-face is? To know as you are known. It’s a mental face-to face then, isn’t it? Face to face with God is to know as God knows. To be God-like.”

“Leaves of the Tree: Prescriptions from Psalms”, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#3—Mary Baker Eddy on Paul’s words in Athens (B4, Acts 17:28):
**“St. Paul said to the Athenians, “For in Him we live and move and have our being.” This statement is in substance identical with my own: “There is no life, truth, substance, nor intelligence in matter.” It is quite clear that this great verity has not yet been fully demonstrated, but it is nevertheless true. If Christian Science reiterates Paul’s teaching, we, as Christian Scientists, should give to the world convincing proof of the validity of this scientific statement of being. Having perceived, in advance of others, this scientific fact, we owe to ourselves and to the world a struggle for its demonstration.” Retrospection and Introspection, 93: 17]

Also, Cobbey Crisler shared these insights on the context of Paul’s words to the Athenians in Acts 17 (B4): “Well, now Paul is heading for the cultural capital of civilization, Athens. And you can’t even go to modern day Athens without appreciating somewhat of what Paul saw, looking around at the remnants of that great city and “the columned buildings that were dedicated to so many gods. It must have moved Paul.” …

“And so, he opens his mouth and begins right away to talk in Athens. Now this is a tough area in which to introduce Christianity, except at least they were willing to listen because everybody talked about anything. I mean there were a lot of weirdo sects and ideas that they welcomed without question in Athens because everybody liked to dispute these ideas anyway.

“He’s in the market, the agora, as well as in the synagogue. He runs into Epicureans; he runs into Stoics.” Now Tarsus where Paul came from happens to be a Stoic stronghold. So he must have been certainly aware of that philosophy…

“They bring him to Areopagus, the hill of Mars or Aries, and they asked him to explain what he has to say.” …

Acts 17:22  Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars’ hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.

Paul, standing there, shows how a lecture can be tailor-made to any environment. And, it’s better than uniformity if you want to get the ear of the locals. And in this way, you will find at no point does Paul mention the Old Testament. Why? (Pause) What would that mean to the Athenians? (See below, Acts 17:23, paraphrased)

Instead, he kind of says, “On my way to the forum…you know. In other words, here I was, and I saw something you had back here. And, it says TO THE UNKNOWN GOD.” (See Acts 17:23 …

“Would everybody be listening? It relates. He’s picked up something locally. And, would you also be listening if he said “That monument you put ‘TO THE UNKNOWN GOD’, I want to tell you a little something about him. He’s unknown to you, but here’s some information that might be helpful… “And then, in Acts 17, verse 24, he describes “that God who made all, and therefore, couldn’t dwell in temples made with hands.” …

We’re reminded of whom? Yes, but since Jesus, we heard that from Stephen, remember? As Saul, himself, he had heard that.

“He dwelleth not in temples made with hands.” (repeated paraphrased)

What do you think that comment does when you’re looking at the Parthenon and buildings like it? “God doesn’t dwell in all of this. He made everything. How can you contain Him?” … Very interesting point.

Have we even arrived at that point today in our thinking? … I doubt the Athenians had either.

“The search where God is…” will end up with the conclusion in the last line of Acts 17, verse 27, “that He’s not very far from every one of us.” And then Paul very cleverly introduces lines from local poets: “In him we live, and move, and have our being” and “for we are also his offspring” – parts of poems we have identified, and they even know the authors. (See below, partial)

Acts 17:28 For in him we live, and move, and have our being**; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.

“After the Master, What? The Book of Acts,by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#4—Hear this Bible citation set to a beautiful tune as part of Hymn 457 (in the 2017 Christian Science Hymnal Supplement) as sung recently at a CedarS Hymn Sing. It is posted for you to see and hear at https://www.cedarscamps.org/videos/


W’s PS#5aCobbey Crisler on Mark 5:1-15 (B17) also told as Luke 8:22, 26-35 (B13):
“In [Luke 8:22-35 and] Mark Chapter 5, Verse 1, we have the very strange incident in the country of the Gadarenes. The ancient texts vary all over the lot here: Gadarenes Gadara, Garisenes, Garis, Gurgesenes, or Gergesa? Gadara was a town. Gerasa was also a town. Neither of them were anywhere near the shore of the lake. But Gergesa is. Right on the shore and located, at least according to recent findings, at the only spot on the Sea of Galilee where the event could ever have happened anyway. The only spot where the sea-place approaches the shore. So, it’s probably Gergesa. Matthew has Gergesenes.

“Verse 2. “Coming out of the ship.” He’s over in Gentile territory, by the way. This is not Jewish territory. It’s on the Eastern side. It’s where the Decapolis cities are, the confederacy of Greek cities. Today the Golan Heights is part of the region.

“Verse 3. “He runs into a man who is living in the tombs.” Interestingly enough, there are rock formations right smack at the point where the Heights approach the sea, where you would say they have the appearance of tombs. “This man had not the strong man bound.” We see the strong man is really mentality, not anatomy.

Verse 3. You and I may have seen some of the pumping-iron movies, and we begin to think anatomy is the strong man. Hardly. Here we have a man of above-average muscular development, but mentally so out of sorts with what is normal. This man has exceeded certain human limitations and “he is able to break iron fetters, chains.”

Verse 4. “Nobody could control him.”

Verse 5. This shows mentality unleashed, undisciplined, and filled with a dualism. He would even attempt to oppose God, or in some cases imitate or ape God. This man’s dwelling is at both extremes. Night and day are extremes. Mountains and tombs are extremes.

Of course, you and I don’t recognize this mental effect, do we? Or do we commute between our mountains and our tombs? Are we in the pits? We know of manic depression, sure. But what about the mountains? Do we have our moments of altitudinous thinking, as well? Really inspired thinking? There we are, buying round trips daily on the mountain-to-tomb local. We get off on occasion somewhere in between. This man had taken it too.

You can see what happens when the carnal mind can no longer take the extremes. The dual personality splits. The kingdom becomes divided against itself. That is being illustrated here.

And the drug effect. Look at the drug effect, the mountains and tombs where these highs and lows flourish. Uppers and downers where one gets captured by the whole necessity for this. It becomes something so addictive, that in order to feel high or low, we need chemical inducement. So, this is not an outdated, outmoded, human problem. This kind of insanity is everywhere attempting to rule human thinking, including within ourselves. Jesus knew this. He was in a Gentile territory. It’s even out of the Jewish context. Therefore, it has a universality about it.

Verse 7. The man with the unclean spirit knows the presence of the cure. Notice the great resistance to the cure that we see illustrated here. “What have I to do with thee, Jesus?” How often is that statement repeated in varying degrees by every single person on this globe? Everyone who has ever heard of the Christ message? Even those claiming to be followers. “What have I to do with thee?”

When we compromise ourselves, or when we lower our standards under pressure, is it not the equivalent of saying, “What do I have to do with thee, Jesus?” Do we resent the role model he represents to thought? “Don’t torment me.”

Verse 8. We’ve got three different treatments here. One, “Come out of the man, unclean spirit.”The word for man is anthropu, which is the root of anthropological. It is not so much a specific man as man in general. It’s a generic term for man. “Come out of manhood, unclean spirit.” He’s talking about impurity. Impurity doesn’t belong within God’s definition of manhood. There’s momentum, again, being applied. Is there a healing? No.

Verse 9. So, the second, “He asked him, ‘What is thy name?’” Jesus is trying to pinpoint or identify the problem. And we find out, it’s very difficult to pinpoint because it’s “Legion.” Remember, when the remedy id oneness or monism, you already know what the problem is. The problem is always the opposite of the remedy. So, you have this multiplicity of problems and psychological reasons for why we’re in the fix we are. “Fix,” as sometimes applied to drugs.

“My name is Legion.” That’s a definition of impurity, by the way, “legion.” Purity is an unmixed state. So, we know what we’re dealing with. Remember one of the Beatitudes mentioned Matthew 5:8, it’s “the pure in heart that see God.”

So, purity is what we need as our “anchor of the soul” as Hebrews 6:19 says. Remember, that later Jesus calls upon “legions of angels,” (Matthew 26:53). Also, “Michael and his angels,” Revelation 12:7, are fighting “the dragon and his angels.”

So, we actually have this conflict here of thoughts. This is a confused mentality. Obviously, it’s chaotic thinking. It has no discipline at all. It’s no “first the blade, then the ear, and then the full grain,” Mark 4:28. That orderly sense of discipline in thought. It has lost all connection or link to possible discipline.

The third treatment given by Jesus in this individual case is one that actually has aroused a great deal of compassion for the swine among its readers. It would not seem to be part of Jesus’ normal procedure to wipe out a herd like this to make a spiritual point. But there is indeed a spiritual point here. One that has to do with the definition of manhood. Remember, Legion is the problem and oneness is the remedy.

Does man’s thinking, as you and I define it, contain a swinish element or nature? What is capable of being agitated by erroneous mental influence? Can manhood be ever defined as calm and free in his thought, when he has elements within his thought, that still victimize him rather than see him as the victor? Perhaps, we are being told here, through this illustration and event, that one of the “no’s” we are to be saying mentally is to the swinish nature that has attached itself to our identity and called itself “Legion.” Perhaps we are subjected to many influences, a legion of influences, instead of God alone the One on the throne.

We know that human nature does commute between the mountains and the tombs. The swine are said, in Luke’s 8:32 version of this, to be nibbling on the mountains. Symbolically does the swinish nature nibble at our altitudinous and highest moments? There is a violence to this self-destruction that occurs at the only spot on the Sea of Galilee where it is possible. If nothing else, we certainly can conclude that swinish nature had no built-in defense to such mental invasions.

Verse 15. Yet manhood can be freed from such influence. For this man, now “clothed and in this right mind” no longer is under subjection to legion. If his right mind is in this sense of oneness, the other mental state obviously was wrong. What expressed that mental state is self-destroyed.

Before this incident, we might have concluded that man had no defense against such mental incursions. Therefore our mental hospitals are destined to be filled. But rather, we discover that man can separate himself out of swinish influences and still stand as a man. Yes, and stand humanly with a humanhood that has been purified. One that is no longer influenceable by the legion of attackers that would claim our mentality as its own in its attempt to possess our thinking without any rights of ownership.

When this incident begins to come to a close, we find that we can even see the sequence of things. Remember Mark 4:28, “first the blade, then the ear, then the full corn.” There’s more behind this blade. (That’s even the definition of animal later.)

Right now, as with everything else, we have the worldview upside down. You and I have been told that we are descendants of the animal kingdom. If that’s the wrong point of view, then the remedy is the opposite. Notice, animals and their natures belong to mankind, and can be found in the definition of man, rather than man finding himself in the definition of the animal.

That’s something we haven’t seriously considered in our twentieth century. Back in the first century, the notion that mankind may have descended from animals was considered absurd. But over time, the evolutionary theory suggested an entirely different kind of origin. This was the result of darkened and dualistic thinking. The mind that defines itself as coming from the animal realm, rather than the realm of the divine, becomes animal in concept. But divine revelation can clean us up. God defines man in a concept of holiness rather than unholiness. We need just to breathe in the Holy Spirit and take into thought what is holy.

I once heard a talk by Geith Plimmer. He recalled a biblical incident where, with such a compassion behind his expressed words, he discussed a dear man who was possessed. And he rejoiced with that idea of possession being used, because it showed that it didn’t really belong to him. He was possessed. The remedy he suggested was to dispossess. To dispossess is the remedy to possession.

Verse 19. How he loved those most glorious words humanly expressing love, “Go home to thy friends.” Here’s a man that had lived in the mountains and the tombs. How long has he had anyone whom he could call a friend? Where is his home? You see what Jesus is now defining as home and friends.

“Tell them.” Notice, he doesn’t tell him not to say anything. This is in a Gentile territory where he encourages the Word to go to other Gentiles. “Go home to thy friends.” Mr. Plimmer pointed out that here, when we first met him, he was a man that could be defined as completely irresponsible. Jesus not only heals him, but he restores the dignity of manhood, as he did in every healing. It was part of the healing. He also gave him responsibility. “Go home to thy friends and tell them.” He was one of the first Gentile disciples, if you could use that word, that took Christianity into that territory. What a prime responsibility for someone who couldn’t account for his actions not very long before! Even before Paul, this man went to the Gentiles.

Is there any record of what he did? There is none past this. But it’s interesting that when the Temple in Jerusalem fell to the Romans in A.D. 70, the Christians, having an advance awareness that this was happening, moved in Pella, part of the Decapolis area. A lot of preparation had been done.
What Mark Recorded, B. Cobbey Crisler**


5b—Check-out a custom narrative written by Ken Cooper for this week’s lesson called “The Gadarene Healed” (B17, Mark 5:1-15).
Ken writes: “Please find the contribution for this week on "Spirit", based on the fascinating testimony of the Gadarene. The mighty legion of his problems was obliterated by Love, and he was able to rejoice in the Spirit.

When we are gifted things by the infinite God, what He gives must also be infinite, – and our joy can reflect that abundance. The Gadarene beheld the infinite power of the Christ, and it ran through him with instant healing. His storm was stilled. There was no remnant of the past, because God’s power is in the NOW, living, vibrant, full. We can all rejoice in the power of the Spirit, for by definition it disannuls any power in matter. We too can prove we live and have our being in God, giving us freedom.

The audio YouTube link is https://youtu.be/rA642Ob3eRs while the PDF version are attached as PDF Downloads on CedarS “Latest Met” web version of this email at https://www.cedarscamps.org/metaphysical/articles/2019/7/love-everyone/

I have also included the shared link for a published poem "No Problem" https://sentinel.christianscience.com/shared/view/b9l6u98cfo?s=e


W’s PS#6—Cobbey Crisler on Psalm 56:4 (B19) –For dominion, treat fear, not the flesh!

“Speaking of fear, look at Psalm 56, Verse 4, “I will not fear what?” “What flesh can do unto me.” So, flesh isn’t the problem. But guess what is? Fear. It’s fearing what flesh can do unto me. Flesh is not the patient, then. One of the most radical discoveries in Biblical therapy: we’ve been treating the wrong patient. That’s not the problem in Biblical thought. [It] wants to be absent from the flesh, not even weigh it in, factor it in to Biblical healing. The flesh has naught to say, but completely submits to what the mental state dictates. That’s dominion.”
“Leaves of the Tree: Prescriptions from Psalms,”
by B. Cobbey Crisler**

  • W’s PS#7—“Spirit will form you anew.” (S28, Science & Health 425:25, a favorite line in Hymn 565 in the 2017 Christian Science Hymnal Supplement, a hymn often requested at CedarS Sunday night Hymn Sings.) This also fits nicely with CedarS 2019 Metaphysical theme: “Behold, I make all things new” (Rev. 21:5 as expounded upon online). In last night’s Directors meeting at the start of Family Camp we all made a closing pledge to “consecrate one’s life anew.” (Misc. 109:26)
  • W’s PS#8— Even if circumstances seem to have us thrown down to the depths of hell, "Whither Shall I Go from Thy Spirit" from Psalm 139 (B22) comforts us with assurance of the uplifting ever-presence of Spirit. We can sing together of this in Hymn 599, "Whither Shall I Go from Thy Spirit", in the 2017 Christian Science Hymnal.

This psalm is a favorite song at several camps and is especially lovely when sung with the descant. You can hear CedarS version of it (and buy a 50th Anniversary trilogy of CedarS CDs all for $25 to go totally to camperships) at http://blog.cedarscamps.org/2011/07/16/order-around-the-clock-a-collection-of-3-cds-with-camp-songs-you-love-created-just-for-cedars/


NEW: W’s PS#9—Apply Divine Equations from our Textbook (S31) to Yourself and to All!
One-line, word equations in Science & Health are “textbook” illustrations of the “Transitive Property of Equality” (www.mathwords.com) (See page 470:23 and 481:3, S31)

470:23 the first of two, simple, one-line, word equations under review states:
“Man (a) is (=) the expression of God’s being.” (b)

Science & Health citation S31 (p. 481:23) the second of two simple, one-line, word equations under review states:
“God’s being (b) is (=) infinity, freedom, harmony, and boundless bliss.” (c)

The Transitive Property of Equality: If a = b and b = c, then a = c

“Man or YOU (a) is (=) the expression of infinity, freedom, harmony, and boundless bliss. (c)

See a picture of these four qualities (as an online, upper right Download) that we each express as featured in 12” high letters at the launch platform for CedarS Cable Ski activity to help serve as a reminder of what this activity helps you to express more freely.

You, like the “Energizer Bunny,” express the synonyms for Infinity including: inexhaustibility, eternity, limitlessness, immeasurability, perpetuity (See https://www.thesaurus.com/browse/rodule )

You, like the Statue of Liberty, express the synonyms for freedom including: opportunity, power, ability, exemption, flexibility, immunity, privilege, right, discretion, facility, leeway, liberty, prerogative, range, scope, unrestraint, carte blanche, elbowroom, free rein, full play, full swing, plenty of rope

You, like a Band, Chorus, Cabin or Family member, express the synonyms for harmony including: cooperation, friendship, consistency, good will, kinship, peace, rapport, tranquility, unanimity, understanding, unity, accord, amicability, compatibility, concord, like-mindedness

You, like a Happy Camper and Stress-free Reflection, express the synonyms for boundless bliss including: unchangeable blessedness, inexhaustible happiness, unlimited gladness, untold joy…


**You can buy your own transcripts of most of Cobbey Crisler’s 28 talks at this website: www.crislerlibrary.co.uk Email your order or inquiry to office@crislerlibrary.co.uk, or directly to Janet Crisler, at janetcrisler7@gmail.com

As a weekly “email Met” subscribers, YOU are considered part of CedarS family and so are entitled to know the password [CedarS] that will enable you to catch some “glorious glimpses of… the divine nature, the essence of Love” (SH 333:24) already poured into CedarS Sessions 1, 2, 3 and 4 activities and cabin groups! (Here’s a link to search past sessions, back to 1962!!)

Please also Click here daily to listen to short CedarS Practitioner Talk(s) given after breakfast every morning (except Sundays) going forward (and backward to 2006)!
“Prac Talks” this session on new insights on applying Christian Science are being delivered by Kerry Jenkins, C.S. and Christie Hanzlik, C.S. and are posted by ~9am (Central Time) for you to pray and practice with us.
Feel free to share these with anyone you feel might be blessed by them.

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