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Mine the GEM of having Christ’s Shepherding Mind-set to see God Expressed Meekly in YOU!
— through Christ’s Animating Mindsets Practiced! (C.A.M.P.!)
Application ideas “mined” by Warren Huff with insights from Cobbey Crisler,
Ken Cooper and others as related

to The Christian Science Bible Lesson on

Christ Jesus
for March 1, 2020


Mine the G.E.M. of Listening for Your Shepherd’s Voice to “follow and rejoice All the rugged way.” (“Feed My Sheep” by Mary Baker Eddy, Hymns 304-309, 573-576)

[Ken wrote:] “The infinity of the Christ is our guarantee of celestial being. It is our divine nature and calling. Jesus was the perfect example and witness. We are called by the Christ and respond to our individual names, witnessing that link of love which unites us in one fold of togetherness and brotherhood. Take away all the drops of the ocean and there would be no sea. Take away a single note from a musical composition and the performance of the composer would be incomplete, – something impossible in Science. We are all of importance. Every sheep in the fold comprises our flock and we each have our part to play in the symphony of heaven! it was recently tweeted we may be a drop in the ocean but the ocean is also a drop in us. So, we may be one of the flock, but the flock is also just part of what we are as the manifestation of the infinity of Christ, all following the Government of Mind.

The YouTube link to the sound recording of “The Good Shepherd”, this week poem with corelative visual images, is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pedj0qY5Cig,

PDF’s are attached as Downloads on CedarS weekly inspirational webpages


Mine the G.E.M. of Bringing the good Shepherd’s care to all you do; of being at one with God Cobbey Crisler on John 10:1 (Golden Text) and 10: 20-16 (Responsive Reading) and John 10:14, 27 (B4).
“Chapter 10. Not too many of us keep sheep anymore. So, this is a lost simile on the twentieth century. Should we be keeping sheep in the real meaning of it? What could you and I do more about our job, our home, our world, our political situation, our community, and church, if we introduced more of the shepherd motive into all of them?
John 10:13 shows the difference between the shepherd-motive and the hireling’s motive who was working just for pay. “The hireling fleeth, because that’s all he was working for is money.” Where’s the difference? “He doesn’t care.”
Let’s ask ourselves the question, do we care? If we care, that’s the shepherd motive. Jesus cared. He walked in the midst of the dissolute, the despairing, the injured, the grieved, and the broken in heart as well as in body. And nobody knew why he did it. The upper classes, those who didn’t have similar problems, wondered why he was with the publicans and sinners. But he said that “the whole didn’t need a physician” (Matt. 9:12; Mark 4:23; Luke 5:31).
He apparently contemplated an Israel in prophecy which the existing Israel, the establishment, had not remotely seen.
He saw the Israel in prophecy which is exactly in accord with Jeremiah’s prediction of the new covenant and Isaiah’s. The new Israel would be composed of those whose needs had been met, where the recipients were, no class, no mass, no private sector, no ghetto, but receptivity gathering the sons and daughters together. They are gathered to prove what is possible on earth as in heaven. The shepherd motive of caring brings us into that new Israel.”

“Jesus says that he is the Shepherd and he also says he is the door. It may look like he is confused. Let me give you an example of how he isn’t. When my wife and I were in Israel, we stopped in a place between Jerusalem and Bethany. I saw what I thought was an unattended flock of sheep. There was also a rock wall with one door or gate. It was an almost complete square. As I wandered around, I was suddenly surprised by the shepherd whom I had disturbed. He rose up. He was stretched across that entry way, getting a few winks.

Right there I had illustrated what Jesus meant in John 10: 2, 11, 14, “I am the shepherd” and in John 10: 7, 9, “I am the door.” Now there was no confusion at all. With the sheep inside an enclosure and the only possible entrance of wild animals or thieves being that door, you had to get through the shepherd in order to get to the sheep. The shepherd was also the door.
John 10:27, 28 (B7) “My sheep hear my voice… and they follow me.” In Mary Baker Eddy’s poem, “Feed My Sheep”, there is the statement, “I will listen for Thy voice.” [Hymn 304] While we were down in that area of Beersheba, we saw many sheep all mixed together. I said to Janet, ‘I wonder how the shepherd is ever going to sort out his sheep. They’re all just mingled together.’ … It wasn’t very long before our shepherd separated himself from the crowd, walked away – never looked over his shoulder at the mixed up sheep— but made some kind of identifying click or clack of his tongue or voice.
“Do you know that every one of his sheep separated themselves from that flock and followed him?! He never doubted. He never looked back. The sheep did their job. The sheep knew his voice. “I will listen for Thy voice.” These lessons are things that in the busy moments of our own twentieth century we need to contemplate. They’re not just symbols. They’re not done just as ancient history. They’re attitudes. They’re states of mind and thought. This is something we often need to consider.”

“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” B. Cobbey Crisler**


Mine the G.E.M. of Divine Love (vs. Genetics) being your Good Shepherd to provide you all good!
Insights by Ruth Huff & others into Psalm 23 (S8, 587:8). Apply each line to yourself!

“Psalm 23 and ME”

Claim these divinely REAL definitions of YOUR heritage in the TWENTY-THIRD PSALM!
They negate the supposed “23 and me” genetic domination of 23 pairs of ancestral
X-Y chromosomes and can prove that they Do Not Apply (D.N.A.) to the real you!

[Bracketed substitutions from Mary Baker Eddy to show "the light which

Christian Science throws on the Scriptures" with an "incorporeal

or spiritual sense" of Love. (Science & Health 578)]

"[Divine Love] is my shepherd;" That’s MY RELATIONSHIP

"I shall not want." That’s MY SUPPLY!

"[Love] maketh me to lie down in green pastures:" That’s MY REST!

"[Love] leadeth me beside still waters." That’s MY REFRESHMENT!

"[Love] restoreth my soul [spiritual sense]:" That’s God’s way of HEALING & MINE!

"[Love] leadeth me in the paths of righteousness” That’s God’s GUIDANCE & MINE!

"For His name's sake." That’s MY PURPOSE!

"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death," That’s MY TESTING!

"I will fear no evil:" That’s MY PROTECTION!

"For [Love] is with me;" That’s God’s FAITHFULNESS and MINE!

"[Love's] rod and [Love's] staff they comfort me." That’s God’s DISCIPLINE and MINE!

"[Love] prepareth a table before me in the presence of mine enemies:" That’s MY HOPE!

"[Love] anointeth my head with oil;" That’s God’s CONSECRATION of ME & MY mission!

"My cup runneth over." That’s God’s ABUNDANCE and MINE!

"Surely goodness & mercy shall follow me all the days of my life:"
That’s God’s BLESSING & Mine!

"And I will dwell in the house [the consciousness] of [Love]" That’s MY SECURITY!

"forever." That’s God’s ETERNAL HERITAGE and MINE!

(partly penned by CedarS Founder, Ruth E. Huff, partly by her son, Warren Huff)


Mine this G.E.M.—Let your thought and life SING with Living in Oneness with God!
Cobbey on “I and my Father are one.” John 10:30 (B17, S17, S22)

“In John 10:30 is Jesus’ great statement, “I and my Father are one.” If this is from the Aramaic, then, the Aramaic word would give the meaning, “I and my Father are in accord.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,”
B. Cobbey Crisler**

Sing with “healing and joy in your heavenly home!” a line from “I and my Father are one” Music Video on YouTube (B17, S17 (315), S22 ( 361)
Here’s a link to an inspiring song by CedarS mom and award-winning Country Music artist, Cherie Brennan. It emphasizes the humble mindset of Christ Jesus and builds upon this week’s Bible Lesson, especially citation S4, SH p. 25:10. Enjoy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZMNlpZavkA

You can learn more about Cherie and buy her CD “You are Loved” (where “I and My Father” is the 4th song) on her website through Spotify at: https://open.spotify.com/album/3Ii5CBrdNs6f8Y3t4l5XHl

Or, on Watchfire Music by Christian Science friend, Peter Link, —LISTEN TO A SAMPLE of “I and my Father are one” SUNG by Mindy Jostyn and BUY IT and the SHEET MUSIC for SOLOISTS at: https://watchfiremusic.com/shop/recordings/songs/i-and-my-father-are-one-2/


Mine the G.E.M. of acting like you know that prophesy is fulfilled now and that “incurability” is healed by changing your concept and believing – Cobbey Crisler on Mark 1:14-15 (B5) Four foundational points for Jesus

Mark 1, Verse 14. We have "John put in prison." He has already disappeared from the scene.

And, ‘‘Jesus comes into Galilee, and his work begins."
Verse 15. There are four foundational aspects to the gospel we need to study. Normally, an architect might refer to just one cornerstone in a building. But let's remember that all four of the corners have cornerstones. To that degree, let's ask ourselves if this is not a clue to understanding Mark. We have a foursquare gospel, and at each corner we have a particular point. If this is true, you should be able to compile the information that follows in the gospel under one of the following four headings.
(1) The announcement that, "the time is fulfilled." What does this mean? Prophecy. The time for the fulfillment of prophesy has arrived. So, everything is just brimming in the gospel of Mark with this great news. All of the expectation is over for the Messianic prophecy: We have a fulfillment now. ‘What could be more exciting than to be living in an era of fulfilled prophecy? Nothing, apparently, because this is what impels the gospel writers to pick up their pens….
Study Mark as if it were a textbook, filled with data that Jesus needed us to know in order to follow him. It is a handbook, so to speak, a textbook where we can find data that can be applied. Those four foundational points, under "the time is fulfilled," you will see over and over again, explicit or implicit, in the text.

(2) The second one, “the kingdom of God is at no distance.” It is right here. Even that idea is radical to Christendom today often because the kingdom of God, or often heaven, is considered to be so far away from any of us now. It is out of reach, and we’re not really behaving ourselves sufficiently to get there. It takes Palomar’s 200 inch reflecting telescope to even get a glimpse of it. But we find the founder of Christianity saying, ''Not so." His theology is based on the fact that "the kingdom of God is at hand."

Do we act like it is? We moan and we groan most of the time. We wouldn't if our state of mind was the “kingdom-of-God-is-at-hand" and the “prophecies-are-fulfilled." But those are only two of the cornerstones.

(3) The third one is “Repent!" That means to change your concept. Now, we’re going very deeply to the roots of what is required of us to get anywhere spiritually. The problem is mental or he never would have stated it in this way.

It would be cruelly misleading if he laid down as one of the four important aspects of his theology the fact that we had to change our concepts of things. The implication is that every human ill, physical, moral, mental, all can be changed mentally. Otherwise, repenting wouldn’t make any. Changing one's concept wouldn't make any difference.

This might be where maybe we temporarily get off the train leading to Jesus' theology. We may say to ourselves, if our bodies are riddled with cancer, of what avail would it be to change our concept? How would that affect the body? The implication is that this is the panacea. Repent ye. Change your concept about things.

Do you realize what kind of a religion that suggests? It's very revolutionary in this respect: nothing is incurable from the point of view of Jesus ' theology. If you can change your concept, then everything is curable. That's some good news of victory that has yet to hit the human race with any impact like Mark, “the hammer.”

(4) The fourth and final cornerstone is to "believe the gospel," That "believe" is not just to hold an opinion that waves in the breeze. This is a conviction and a trust in the pronouncements of the gospel of the kingdom of God, and that "kingdom of God is at hand."

With that structure of the gospel in mind, we can do this kind of work together. As a matter of fact, the reward comes from doing this work individually and meeting each other that way. It affects the world's climate by doing this kind of deep research. In your own individual study, try those four columns.

The time is fulfilled,

The kingdom of God is at hand,

Repent ye,

Believe the gospel,

and see how you can outline the whole gospel in that way.

We may just discover that Peter becomes one of the most polished orators of all time. Yet he is regarded as a rather simplistic fisherman who probably stumbled in Greek and was more at home in his Aramaic.”

“What Mark Recorded,by B. Cobbey Crisler**


Mine this G.E.M. and Find our Shepherd’s divine supply to be inexhaustible! [Warren:] To frequently remind me of this, I brought home from my January 2020 trip to the Holy Land both a spoon cradle and T-shirts with the graphic of an ancient mosaic of the loaves and fish. (See Downloads in upper right online.) The T-shirt has this reminder that so perfect for all Christians as well as all CedarS workers and donors to live by:

“LOVE IS LIKE FIVE LOAVES AND TWO FISH.
ALWAYS TOO LITTLE UNTIL YOU START TO GIVE IT AWAY”

Below are Cobbey Crisler’s insights on Mark’s version of the feeding of the multitude. It comes to us this week in Matthew 15:29-38 (B11) with its provision of seven vs. “five loaves” to start with – and its twelve (vs. seven) baskets of leftovers as in the other three Gospels.

{Cobbey Crisler:]
“Verse 34. And he sees that “they were as sheep not having a shepherd.”

Look up that comment and you will find it in the Old Testament. Then read around it in the Old Testament to get the context of it. You will hardly find a statement by Jesus that does not have an Old Testament root or precedent, which is why he is always saying, “It is written.” But, many of the times when he doesn’t say it-is-written, it is implied.

The only so-called miracle in all four gospels is the feeding of the “five thousand,” Verses 35-44. I put it in quotes because they were only counting the men. Out of the little boy’s lunch box comes five loaves and two fishes. We hear that from the gospel of John Chapter 6, Verse 13. They feed a multitude. Now we have a lesson on economics given to us by the Master. He didn’t regard that as a problem either. No Malthusian limitation on man that we’re going to outgrow our supply, and, therefore, we should kill off sectors of the human race in order to meet the supply. That’s Malthus and his philosophy of necessity. But we find Jesus saying instead in Matthew 14:16, “They need not depart.” Malthus says they need to be killed, but Jesus is saying, “They need not depart.”

Mark 6.37. The disciples say it would be impossible to feed the multitude, that it would take about “two hundred pennyworth.” The group was considerably more than five thousand if you count the women and the children.

What Jesus said to all the disciples made them become part of the remedy. Twelve baskets were taken around. There were twelve disciples. Each one was made to participate in the abundant result and learn from it. They started out with only five loaves and two fishes. They ended up with more fragments left over than they had when they started out. More available. That’s divine economics. It doesn’t exhaust.”
“What Mark Recorded,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**

[W: Watch for a BONUS (soon to be emailed separately) that shares a modern-day, loaves-and- fishes, example of divine supply as an amazing and quick answer to a humble prayer made with “an absolute faith that all things are possible to God, — a spiritual understanding of Him, an unselfed love.” (SH1:2)]


Mine and obey Jesus’ G.E.M. of an imperative instruction – (Esteem and) “Feed my sheep!"
as he commanded Peter to do at the morning meal after a fish-less fishing night and an abundant catch, on the right side.

[Cobbey Crisler on John. 21:13.]
"Jesus," in his characteristic gesture, "took bread, and gave them, and fish likewise.” This was indeed a breakfast, but how different from that last supper! This breakfast was celebrating his victory over death. Not looking forward to tragedy, death, and lack of comprehension by the disciples, the dawn was in the disciples thought as well as over the Sea of Galilee on that special morning.

Now we engage in a dialogue between Jesus and Peter. The dialogue as printed in the King James Version, seems rather dull and repetitive indeed. In the original Greek however, there is a depth of meaning.

John. 21:15, "Jesus says to Peter, Do you love me more than these?" It's obvious that Peter is being tested. We may ask, tested for what? That becomes clearer later in the story.

… Another word which we find repeated in the Greek New Testament, is philia, a word that conveys brotherly love. It still has a sense of class consciousness about it. It has the compassion and the sympathy, such as organizations like the Peace Corps show. But there is sometimes a condescending quality in the thinking of those who are expressing love at the philia level. Almost like patting the head of the one you are helping. As if implicitly we were saying, you're down there and l’m up here, and I'm going to try to help you.

The Greeks had a higher sense of love than that. And of course, taken out of classical Greek, it has a renewed and fuller meaning in concept in the New Testament. That word is agape. Agape, according to one commentator and lexicographer, conveys the following, "To desire good for the one you esteem. The concept of divine love."

If I should to choose to love you at the level of agape, look what is required of me. First, I must esteem you. That's not patting you on the head. That's eye-to-eye respect and esteem. Can one really have love anywhere without that quality of respect? I must esteem you. But that, too, could be a passive sense of love, without that other part of the definition which this one commentator had provided.

To desire good for one you esteem. I must be actively employed in desiring for you good or I am not operating at the level of agape.

What word do you think Jesus uses when he says to Peter, "Do you love me?" ''Agapao?" he says. But Peter responds in the original text, "Yes, Lord you know that I love thee." But he uses the word "phileo." Maybe that explains Jesus' repetition.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” B. Cobbey Crisler**


Mine these G.E.M.s to Do the “imperative commands*” Jesus knew we disciples were capable of doing when he commanded us to do them! [*summarized by Mary Baker Eddy in SH 37:25 (S26) with Cobbey Crisler insights on: 1) Matthew 5:48; 2) Acts 2:16, 17 on Mark 16:15; 3) Matthew 10:8.]

  1. Mine the G.E.M. of obeying Jesus’ 1st “imperative command”—See & Be Your Perfect Self!
    (SH 37:27, S26—and Cobbey Crisler on Matthew 5, Verse 48]

Jesus’ final summary … "We should be perfect," he said. According to what measurement? How does he regard when he got the revelation from God that Jesus was the Son of God? Did that mean for Jesus that he was the only Son of God? Notice the same relationship goes beyond, to us. Because he said it's a mandate, "Be ye therefore perfect." Why? "Even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect." If the original is perfect, the image must be.

Again, we can compare how Moses viewed this. He had somewhat the same to say. But he didn't say it in the strength of the present tense that Jesus did. In fact, in Deuteronomy 18, (Verse 13), Moses is recorded as saying, "Thou shalt be perfect before the Lord thy God." Same point but different tense. Jesus said, "Be ye therefore perfect."
“Book of Matthew, Auditing the Master: A Tax-Collectors Report,” B. Cobbey Crisler**

  1. Mine the G.E.M. of obeying Jesus’ 2nd “imperative command*”— “Go ye into all the world, and preach…” [Mark 16:15 in *SH 37:27, S26—+ Cobbey Crisler insights on Peter’s keeping this universal preaching command by Jesus in his first public lecture (Acts 2:16, 17) by citing further scriptural justification for his universal outreach of preaching to all.]

[Cobbey:] “…what is Peter’s method? He goes where? To the scripture. You see, it goes back to “the prophet Joel.” (See below, Acts 2:16)

Acts 2:16 But this is that which was spoken by the prophet Joel;

Here is again a use of scripture as fulfillment! Here is prophesy, and here is fulfillment, dovetailing – all, subordinate to the Holy Spirit.

And, the prophecy we read about is about “pouring out the Spirit of God on all flesh.” (See below, Paraphrased) Please note that Acts 2, verse 17, included “not only sons, but daughters, shall prophesy.” (See below)

Acts 2:17 And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams:

And this free, uninhibited, and still disciplined, access to the one Spirit by all nations, peoples, sexes, social levels, economic status, characterizes Christianity from the very beginning – not necessarily in the member’s thought, but that’s what the Holy Ghost is communicating, whether the members believe it or hear it, even today.

The separation into denominationalism was not the Holy Spirit’s idea. The embracing of universal humanity was. And here, we find even the ability to prophecy, both sexes, and not necessarily limited to nationality.”
“After the Master What? — The Book of Acts” by B. Cobbey Crisler**

  1. Mine the G.E.M. of obeying Jesus’ 3rd “imperative command*”— “Heal the sick!”
    (*SH 37:27, S26—and Cobbey Crisler insights on Matthew 10, Verse 7, 8]

"Say," Look at the first words there to say. Is that a coincidence, or is that essential? Where have we run into that statement before? "The kingdom of heaven is at hand." Who said it? It was Jesus' first statement (Matthew 4:17) after "Repent."

The assignments given to the disciples would not be assignments they were incapable of doing, or Jesus would have been unwise.

(Verse 8). He said, "Heal the sick." What do you expect them to do? He said, "Cleanse the lepers, raise the dead, and cast out devils." Notice the sequence. The things he did. Even putting casting-out-devils at a higher level of what was required of prayer than raising the dead. Then stating, "Freely ye have received, freely give."
“Book of Matthew, Auditing the Master: A Tax-Collectors Report,” B. Cobbey Crisler**


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