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W’s Post Scripts: Claim YOUR long (eternal) life heredity!
“Find herein a ‘canny’ crumb” (Mis. xi) or insights from Cobbey Crisler or others on citations for
“Life”
the Christian Science Bible Lesson for July 15-21, 2019

I’m sending this email of some spiritual sense application ideas from Cobbey Crisler and others hoping that you “find herein a ‘canny’ crumb… (to) become footsteps to joys eternal.” (Miscellaneous Writings, xi:15.)


Warren’s (W’s) PS#1 Ken Cooper wrote a backstory monologue from the perspective of Tabitha’s best friend called “Tabitha.” It is beautifully narrated by his wife, Sue. (Luke 17:12-19, B17).

Ken wrote: The demonstration of Life is the same as the demonstration of Love They exist together, interchangeably, with Life / Love as the fountain which ever flows, and Love / Life as the abundance of good deeds which are themselves eternal in the heavens.

The story of Tabitha is one that resonates so well, – a Christian character that was Christian even before she had heard of Jesus, – naturally doing what she could for those in need, and when she heard of the Christ her life no doubt became even more focused in love for others. She was a fountain of love and after her arising from the experience of death, a veritable beacon of life. Peter recognised too that love knew no boundaries and his own ministry took off soon after. His promise to “Feed my sheep” was being beautifully fulfilled.

The You tube link is a monologue read by Sue, as Tabitha's best friend: https://youtu.be/P0EGYNPwGVk The color and black ink copies are attached as PDFs [in the upper right of CedarS online version.]


W’s PS#2—Cobbey Crisler on Ps. 16:8 (B4) + preceding verses on the divine source of your inheritances and the always at-hand nature of mental medicine.
Psalm 16:5, heredity is being dealt with in this pharmacy of the Psalms. "The LORD" is what? "The portion of mine inheritance!" Sometimes we're proud of our inheritances. At other times, we're ashamed of them. To anchor inheritance, heritage, and heredity in God, is, first, a radically different concept of origin, where we came from. Secondly, it only allows for the expression of the nature from which it is flowing, and that's divine. The only inheritances, then, can be divine, if that logic prevails.

In Verse 6 you will note that [deep] concern the psalmist [has] about hereditary limitations on his ability. Apparently, he comes to the conclusion through accepting the divine fact, the prescriptions he’s had filled, "Yea, I have a goodly heritage.” ··

Kidneys are the problem in Verse 7. There's a very polite Elizabethan word used in the Bible, "reins. That has nothing to do with what holds horses back; in some cases it's used that way. But it's also the translation of the word that literally means "kidneys." Calvin's talking about the anatomy of the soul, remember of every part of the soul that he finds being mirrored in the psalms. But we also are finding specific references to portions of the anatomy that give out, that fail, that act up, and on which we are dependent if the body is dominant; but biblical therapy, if we elect that method, we've got to be absent from.

We find that Verse 7, if it weren't quite as tragic for the psalmist, it would be slightly amusing, in the fact that it reminds us of ourselves. "I will bless the LORD, who hath given me advice,” but if that’s all it took to get our attention, that would be one thing. But, he says kidneys also instruct me in the night seasons. [Audience laughter] I get cornered·.. I'm desperate. Now I'm back to God again, in a way. So very often these anatomical reminders are warnings.

But remembering also that there are two levels that every biblical concept is expressing itself, the outer one and the inner one. That kidneys also is meant to refer to the mind as the interior self, even Webster under "kidney" talks about temperament and disposition. Almost all of the anatomical words have mental equivalents. It’s as if back when our vocabulary was being formulated or translated from previous vocabularies of earlier tongues that we've had this psychosomatic link: We've had the physical and the mental attached even to portions of the anatomy.

Why has there been almost an unobserved record being kept by those who have investigated or seen or lived through some of these physical conditions, that also the mental state that accompanied them has been remembered. What is the (nearest dispensary) as far as Bible therapy is concerned?

Verse 8, "I have set the LORD always before me: because [he is] at my right hand, I shall not be moved.

“Leaves of the Tree: Prescriptions from Psalms,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#3—Cobbey Crisler on Ps. 1:1-3 (B5) on Biblical therapy (recently transcribed).
“The very opening Psalm sets the tone for the entire psalter… We’re told right away that happiness, certainly an objective of all of us, is the result if a man doesn’t do certain things and does do other things… Don’t follow the advice of the ungodly… the morally wrong… Don’t sit in the seat of those who deride or mock. That’s the purgative… What do we take, then as the restorative “medicine?” His delight is in what?… “Meditation day and night in God’s law.” [Psalm 1:2] His teaching. Then the tree appears in Verse 3, “that tree that brings forth fruit in his season with the leaf that will not wither or fade.” That tree is mentioned later in Ezekiel [47:12]… Of course, we find the whole idea expanding when we reach that tree in the last chapter of the Bible. That tree has grown in our thought too. Its grand root has been fed by the rivers of spiritual inspiration. That fruit is fair. It’s never consumed. Its leaf is for medicine. The leaves of the tree may include prescriptions from the Psalms that we will be focusing on.”

“Leaves of the Tree: Prescriptions from Psalms,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#4—Cobbey Crisler on John 10 (B11): bring a shepherd’s care to all you do; be at one with God:
“Chapter 10. Not too many of us keep sheep anymore. So, this is a lost simile on the twentieth century. Should we be keeping sheep in the real meaning of it? What could you and I do more about our job, our home, our world, our political situation, our community, and church, if we introduced more of the shepherd motive into all of them?
John 10:13 shows the difference between the shepherd-motive and the hireling’s motive who was working just for pay. “The hireling fleeth, because that’s all he was working for is money.” Where’s the difference? “He doesn’t care.”
Let’s ask ourselves the question, do we care? If we care, that’s the shepherd motive. Jesus cared. He walked in the midst of the dissolute, the despairing, the injured, the grieved, and the broken in heart as well as in body. And nobody knew why he did it. The upper classes, those who didn’t have similar problems, wondered why he was with the publicans and sinners. But he said that “the whole didn’t need a physician” (Matt. 9:12; Mark 4:23; Luke 5:31).
He apparently contemplated an Israel in prophecy which the existing Israel, the establishment, had not remotely seen.
He saw the Israel in prophecy which is exactly in accord with Jeremiah’s prediction of the new covenant and Isaiah’s. The new Israel would be composed of those whose needs had been met, where the recipients were, no class, no mass, no private sector, no ghetto, but receptivity gathering the sons and daughters together. They are gathered to prove what is possible on earth as in heaven. The shepherd motive of caring brings us into that new Israel.”

“Jesus says that he is the Shepherd and he also says he is the door. It may look like he is confused. Let me give you an example of how he isn’t. When my wife and I were in Israel, we stopped in a place between Jerusalem and Bethany. I saw what I thought was an unattended flock of sheep. There was also a rock wall with one door or gate. It was an almost complete square. As I wandered around, I was suddenly surprised by the shepherd whom I had disturbed. He rose up. He was stretched across that entry way, getting a few winks.

Right there I had illustrated what Jesus meant in John 10: 2, 11, 14, “I am the shepherd” and in John 10: 7, 9, “I am the door.” Now there was no confusion at all. With the sheep inside an enclosure and the only possible entrance of wild animals or thieves being that door, you had to get through the shepherd in order to get to the sheep. The shepherd was also the door.
John 10:27, 28 “My sheep hear my voice… and they follow me.” In Mary Baker Eddy’s poem, “Feed My Sheep”, there is the statement, “I will listen for Thy voice.” [Hymn 304] While we were down in that area of Beersheba, we saw many sheep all mixed together. I said to Janet, ‘I wonder how the shepherd is ever going to sort out his sheep. They’re all just mingled together.’ … It wasn’t very long before our shepherd separated himself from the crowd, walked away never looked over his shoulder at the mixed up sheep, but made some kind of identifying click or clack of his tongue or voice.
“Do you know that every one of his sheep separated themselves from that flock and followed him? He never doubted. He never looked back. The sheep did their job.. The sheep knew his voice. “I will listen for Thy voice.” These lessons are things that in the busy moments of our own twentieth century we need to contemplate. They’re not just symbols. They’re not done just as ancient history. They’re attitudes. They’re states of mind and thought. This is something we often need to consider.”
In John 10:30, Jesus’ great statement, “I and my Father are one.” If this is from the Aramaic, then, the Aramaic word would give the meaning, “I and my Father are in accord.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,”
B. Cobbey Crisler**


W's PS#5—Cobbey Crisler on Acts 9: 36-42 (B18) Peter raises a dead Tabitha… (see also PS#1)
[As a prequel to the raising of Tabitha, nearby] “at Lydda, Peter heals a man named Aeneas who for eight years has been paralyzed, unable to move. It didn’t take long for the news to get around that this kind of healing work was being accomplished by the early Christians [and for Tabitha’s friends to send for Peter].

“In a neighboring “town of Joppa we find a woman named Tabitha. … She had had an exemplary life, had done much good for many.” (See Acts 9:36) …

Acts 9:39 Then Peter arose and went with them. When he was come, they brought him into the upper chamber: and all the widows stood by him weeping, and shewing the coats and garments which Dorcas made, while she was with them.

“Do you recall back in the narratives of the gospel where a similar situation occurred, and Peter was there? It was the raising of Jairus’ daughter… Do you remember when Jesus came into that environment that you could almost cut it into square blocks of moisture, the grief was so thick? There were paid mourners at that point. As a matter of fact, we are told that even the poorest individual was entitled to at least three instruments at the funeral service. You can imagine Jairus, being a ruler of the Synagogue, the extent of noise, and activity, and mourning that must have occurred at the passing of Jairus’ daughter.” [Clearly Peter remembered what Jesus did and followed the Master’s method—starting by clearing out the funereal thought of the mourners.]

Acts 9:40 But Peter put them all forth, and kneeled down, and prayed; and turning him to the body said, Tabitha, arise. And she opened her eyes: and when she saw Peter, she sat up.

Acts 9:41 And he gave her his hand, and lifted her up, and when he had called the saints and widows, presented her alive.

Acts 9:42 And it was known throughout all Joppa;
After the Master, What? – The Book of Acts, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#6—Cobbey Crisler on John 8:51 quoted by Mary Baker Eddy in Science & Health (S29, p. 428:7)
In John 8:51 Jesus said, “If a man keeps my saying, he will never see death."

An unusual statement because certainly his disciples went on and saw the death process happening all around them. So once again, what does Jesus mean? What is the intent? What is the meaning? Dodd says it's such a strong statement that it really excludes the possibility of ceasing to live. That there is an eternality to it. How would you feel that was intended? "If a man keep my saying, he shall never see death."

Take the raising of Tabitha or Dorcas. Peter went in there. Everyone else around there saw death. Was it helping the situation? Did it solve the problem called death? Peter must have gone in there with a radically different point of view. And did it have a radically different result?

The statement in John 8:58 really started a popular commotion. Jesus says, "Before Abraham was, I am.” Does that fit into his statement about, "no man ascendeth up to heaven save he that has come down from heaven, even the son of man that is in heaven "? Is there a beginning for man, divinely speaking? Does it hold within it the key of eliminating the last enemy called death?
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” B. Cobbey Crisler**


**You can buy your own transcripts of most of Cobbey Crisler’s 28 talks at this website: www.crislerlibrary.co.uk Email your order or inquiry to office@crislerlibrary.co.uk, or directly to Janet Crisler, at janetcrisler7@gmail.com

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