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Here are insights from Cobbey Crisler and others on some citations for
“Spirit”
The Christian Science Bible Lesson for August 12, 2018

Warren’s (W’s) PS#1Mary Baker Eddy on Paul’s words in Athens (RR, Acts 17:28):
**“St. Paul said to the Athenians, “For in Him we live and move and have our being.” This statement is in substance identical with my own: “There is no life, truth, substance, nor intelligence in matter.” It is quite clear that this great verity has not yet been fully demonstrated, but it is nevertheless true. If Christian Science reiterates Paul’s teaching, we, as Christian Scientists, should give to the world convincing proof of the validity of this scientific statement of being. Having perceived, in advance of others, this scientific fact, we owe to ourselves and to the world a struggle for its demonstration.” Retrospection and Introspection, 93: 17]

Also, Cobbey Crisler shared these insights on the context of Paul’s words to the Athenians in Acts 17 (Responsive Reading—RR): “Well, now Paul is heading for the cultural capital of civilization, Athens. And you can’t even go to modern day Athens without appreciating somewhat of what Paul saw, looking around at the remnants of that great city and “the columned buildings that were dedicated to so many gods. It must have moved Paul.” …

“And so he opens his mouth and begins right away to talk in Athens. Now this is a tough area in which to introduce Christianity, except at least they were willing to listen because everybody talked about anything. I mean there were a lot of weirdo sects and ideas that they welcomed without question in Athens because everybody liked to dispute these ideas anyway.

“He’s in the market, the agora, as well as in the synagogue. He runs into Epicureans; he runs into Stoics.” Now Tarsus where Paul came from happens to be a Stoic stronghold. So he must have been certainly aware of that philosophy…

“They bring him to Areopagus, the hill of Mars or Aries, and they asked him to explain what he has to say.” …

Acts 17:22  Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars’ hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.

Paul, standing there, shows how a lecture can be tailor-made to any environment. And, it’s better than uniformity if you want to get the ear of the locals. And in this way, you will find at no point does Paul mention the Old Testament. Why? (Pause) What would that mean to the Athenians? (See below, Acts 17:23, paraphrased)

Instead, he kind of says, “On my way to the forum…you know. In other words, here I was, and I saw something you had back here. And, it says TO THE UNKNOWN GOD.” (See Acts 17:23 …

“Would everybody be listening? It relates. He’s picked up something locally. And, would you also be listening if he said “That monument you put ‘TO THE UNKNOWN GOD’, I want to tell you a little something about him. He’s unknown to you, but here’s some information that might be helpful… “And then, in Acts 17, verse 24, he describes “that God who made all, and therefore, couldn’t dwell in temples made with hands.” …

We’re reminded of whom? Yes, but since Jesus, we heard that from Stephen, remember? As Saul, himself, he had heard that.

“He dwelleth not in temples made with hands.” (repeated paraphrased)

What do you think that comment does when you’re looking at the Parthenon and buildings like it? “God doesn’t dwell in all of this. He made everything. How can you contain Him?” … Very interesting point.

Have we even arrived at that point today in our thinking? … I doubt the Athenians had either.

“The search where God is…” will end up with the conclusion in the last line of Acts 17, verse 27, “that He’s not very far from every one of us.” And then Paul very cleverly introduces lines from local poets: “In him we live, and move, and have our being” and “for we are also his offspring” – parts of poems we have identified, and they even know the authors. (See below, partial)

Acts 17:28 For in him we live, and move, and have our being**; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.

“After the Master, What? The Book of Acts”, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#2—Cobbey Crisler on John 6:63 (B4), plus the context verses before and after:
John 6:62, "What and if ye shall see the Son of Man ascend up where he was before?" Nativity in the Spirit. There can't be the magnetic pull back to earth if that connection has been severed or proved never to have been a real connection.

In John 6:63, Jesus impinges upon what has been considered laws of physics because he views matter in a radical way. He makes the statement, "It is the spirit that quickeneth.” That is where you find life. So if you want to talk about nativity anywhere, you better deal with origin and Spirit. "The flesh profiteth nothing.”

You see how close one needs to be to Jesus in thought to understand what has been referred to as the Communion Supper. If he is accurate in saying, "the flesh profiteth nothing, "neither would symbolically eating it profit anything. So, it must not be the flesh he is talking about, but that great transformation that he is proving in his life to be possible to the Son of Man. John 1:14 refers to it as "the Word that was made flesh.” The Word connects us to Spirit, not flesh. Here is part of that Word underscoring the message that, "It is the Spirit that quickeneth, the flesh profiteth nothing.

What happened in John 6:66? "Many walked right out," as soon as he had this radical statement to say about matter.

John 6:67. Jesus had to turn to the twelve, and said, “Will you go away?"

John 6:68. Peter had one of those classic remarks that he makes. It's really a lovely one. He looks around to the alternatives and says, "Lord, where will we go? You have the words of eternal life." He got the message. The words of eternal·life, not the flesh of eternal life. "You have the words of eternal life.”

Jesus' brethren in John 7:3 try to persuade him to come out into the open, and hire a public relations firm. If you are what you think you are, then back it up in the world's way.

John 7:5,"Neither did his brethren believe in him."

John 7:6. He announces, “My time is not yet come." There's an indication in Jesus’ own thought that he knew there would be a prophetic hour which must be fulfilled. The ingredients were not there yet. So, he indicates, "My prophetic hour is not yet come. Your time is always ready. “They did not have a solid understanding of prophecy.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#3Cobbey Crisler on I Corinthians 3:16 (B6), plus context verses before and after:
“In Verse 13 it says that Moses had to “put a veil on his face,” because… they weren’t really ready to face the abolition of so much that we trust right now that doesn’t deserve our trust, so much that we depend upon, other than God.”

Instead of that veil, look what we must do in Verse 18, "We all, with," what? "Open face." Now here are the instructions; when in doubt, read the instructions. "We all, with open face," no veil, no mist. "Behold," how? "As in a glass." Immediately we're talking about what? Original and reflection. What are we supposed to look at? What's our model? "The glory of the Lord," and look what's going to happen.

Are we going to be changed into shame? No, the more we look at our Original, the more we will be "changed." It's passive again; we're not doing the changing. Our focus on God changes us. The more light we face, the more transparent we become for that light. We "are changed into the same image."

Does it happen overnight, all at once? No, "from glory to glory." Here we have the word glory expressing the very steps of our way, not from crisis to crisis, but from "glory," that's victory. There is an identity that is showing its supremacy over everything that the world has calculated to suppress it. It's "from glory to glory" that we go down the way, making visible spiritual progress, because it's happening from "the Spirit of the Lord."

This verse has caused the Interpreter's Bible Dictionary to say that glory to Paul is "a partly fulfilled reality, although it is also a future expectation into which we enter by degrees."

We know when we've progressed just as we know when we've been inspired. We have already found glory palpable to our spiritual senses right here. Here is the link the human has with the divine, the link that we can tug on in the midst of kinds of bad news. This is why the gospel, or good news, elevates, uplifts our human experience because it is linked to facts that are quite applicable now, even though only partly fulfilled, perhaps some even tenuously based on what we think is hope rather than present fulfillment.”
transcribed from “Glory: Divine Nature in The Bible,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#4—Cobbey Crisler on II Corinthians 5:1, 5 (B7), +surrounding context verses
II Cor. 5, verse 1. Where we are now is a tabernacle, which if “dissolved, we have a building of God, an house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens…” (We look out of heavenly consciousness—every window has a heavenly view. We worship where we live—Our bodies are our ultimate idols, if we are living there.

Verse 4. For we that are in this tabernacle “do groan, being burdened:” Jesus said “take my yoke upon you for my yoke is easy and my burden light.”…

Verse 6. It’s not what we see but what we know that matters: “Therefore we are always confident, knowing that, whilst we are at home in the body, we are absent from the Lord.” This is one of the most radical statements in the whole Bible that is virtually skated over.

It is foolhardy to adapt ourselves to live in corporeality. You are a tenant in a tomb if at home in the body. Why be so satisfied with data coming to us from the 5 channels of the corporeal senses?
Jesus said “Take no thought for your body.”

Socrates said “The dead body will not be me. Don’t let him talk about burying Socrates. Say only that you are burying the body.”

Ishmael (In Moby Dick said “My body is but the lees of my better being.”
Transcribed from notes in the margins of Warren’s Bible from a talk by Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#5–Cobbey Crisler on Luke 4:16-19 (B8), +surrounding context verses:
“Luke indicates that he understands this [Jesus’ period of temptations in the wilderness] has been a power test for Jesus because in Verse 14 he uses that word, "Jesus returned" not in any form of power that Satan had tried to impose upon him [“to To take personal power, political power, and priestly power”]. But rather, "in the power of the Spirit into Galilee"—[“in the law that relates man directly to God, the source of the only power there is. (CC)]I

He appears in his hometown of Nazareth. Here is a hometown boy that has made good, locally, mostly in Capernaum, not far away. He comes back. "His fame has spread." They invited him to do some of the reading publicly (Verse 16). They hand him Isaiah (Verse 17). If they handed him a scroll, he would have had to spend some time unrolling it to find exactly what he was looking for. This particular verse is very close to the end.

Isaiah 61, Verse 1, is what Jesus is reading. Notice, it's very specifically a prophecy of the Messiah. The word related to Messiah appears in the word "Anointed. " In Hebrew that's the word relating it to the Messiah. "The Spirit of the Lord (is) upon me." Notice, Luke has just said in Verse 1 of this Chapter that "Jesus was filled with the Spirit." Here the prophecy says (in Luke 4, Verse 18), "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me.

Jesus is saying this in the congregation of the synagogue of his hometown. He's simply reading the Old Testament. If he read Scripture like he cited it spontaneously, like he healed with it, you can imagine you probably would have heard a pin drop in that synagogue. Add to that the fact that Jesus knew he was fulfilling every word of that prophecy in himself and in his own career. Think of the impact in that environment.

Here, then, is God's definition of the Messiah through prophecy:

Number one, the Messiah would do what? "Preach the gospel to the poor.”

Gospel doesn't just mean "good news," It means, in particular, news of victory.

What's the second one? "Heal the brokenhearted.”

The third, “Preach deliverance to the captives. "

The fourth, “Recovering of sight to the blind. "

The fifth, “To set at liberty them that are bruised.”

And finally, Verse 19, “To preach the acceptable year of the Lord."

Having said all those things, having defined the Messiah in the Bible, he closes the Book and he sits down (Verse 20). There is a long silence. Everyone is looking at him. He adds (in Verse 21), "This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears.

Unfortunately, his hometown reacts violently (Verse 28), especially to Verses 25 through 27, where he goes back into the Bible for two very significant events in the history of the Jews, and certainly in the history of healing. One was the widow that Elijah visited (Verse 26). In the midst of the famine, she had an endless supply of oil (1 Kings 17:16). The next one in Verse 27 is Elisha's healing of Naaman's leprosy (2 Kings 5:14).

Why would the audience at Nazareth be so incensed by what Jesus is bringing out in these stories? He was talking about foreigners, wasn't he? When you read it, think of this emphasis. He said, "I tell you quite factually, there were many widows in Israel. There were many Jewish widows. But Elijah didn't go to any of them.

(Verse 26) Instead he went to a Lebanese widow."

Is it really nationality that makes the difference? Is it really sex that makes the difference? Or age, or economic status?

No, it's receptivity, isn't it? You couldn't find it in Israel, but you could find that in Lebanon. In fact, that’s the only place Elijah found it.

It's quite a commentary on the lack of faith among the monotheists of Israel. There were many lepers in Israel during Elisha's time, but he didn't go to any of them. He went to the commander in chief of the enemy forces, the Syrian general. There was more receptivity in Naaman's thought than he found in Israel.

Remember how often Jesus says to some of those he cures, like the centurion and some of those who were not Jewish, he says in Matthew 8:10, "I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel."

The receptivity message is that God is universally accessible. They didn't like that message. Verse 29, They "thrust him out of the city." They nearly killed him. That was the attempt. (Verse 30,) "But Jesus passing through the midst of them went his way.

I suggest to you, as my father suggested to me once in discussing this incident, that it is easier to accept prophecy than it is to accept fulfillment. With prophecy, one may have been trained to respect and revere it over the years. But when fulfillment occurs, who's ready for that, especially in one’s own home town? That's the point Jesus said (in Verse 24), “No prophet is accepted in his own country."

Later we find Jesus telling his followers to search the Scriptures (John 5:39).

They will find him there which more or less implies that if we can't find Jesus in

Prophecy, we can't find Jesus.

Luke 4:33, This first specific healing is the one of the unclean devil. Many of these healings require steps. There is a sequence in healing, in many cases, three specific phases that Jesus goes through before the healing occurs.

One asks the question, "Why? Couldn't Jesus heal instantaneously?" We know he did. But look at the value for us in having the method that he used preserved step by step.

“Luke the Researcher” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#6 –Cobbey Crisler on John 1:43-50 (B9) +surrounding context verses:
John 1:43. "The next day," so we're really getting a diary here. "The next day Jesus is about to go into Galilee, and he finds Philip. He says to Philip, “Follow me, Philip."

John 1:44. "Philip is a native of the town of Bethsaida," which is very near where the Jordan flows into the Sea of Galilee at the northern end.

John 1:45. "Philip runs to find Nathanael." It's interesting to see the receptive thought speaking to the receptive thought. Nathanael hears from Philip, "We've found who Moses wrote about in the prophets." Nathanael having found out the candidate that Philip suggests for all of this imposing fulfillment came from Nazareth. This gives you some idea of the opinion of Nazareth at that time. As a matter of fact, no other ancient literature of the time mentions Nazareth. Even a list of Roman cities doesn't list Nazareth. That's how insignificant it was.

John 1:46. So, it also explains why Nathanael says, "Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" Philip who had learned his Master’s answer to attract the inquirer doesn't bother to try to solve that enigma for Nathanael; he leaves it up to him. That's what makes disciples. If you and I can respond to “Come and See," then there’s a discipleship factor that is, perhaps,a clue to the degree of our receptivity.

John 1:47. Nathanael comes to see. “Jesus sees him and says, Behold, an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile!” He doesn’t hide a thing. It’s all there on the surface. Just like he said, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?”

John 1:48. Nathanael said, “How come you know me so well?” Doesn’t your translation read that way? Jesus says to him, “Before Phillip even called you, I saw you under that fig tree, over a distance, mind you, no telescope. I knew right where you were.” Do you see Jesus’ sensitivity to where the receptive thought was, and it was not limited to geography? It was mental. I don’t know what else it could be. It obviously wasn’t a physical thing. He hadn’t moved. At leaset there isn’t any indication here.

John 1:49. Nathanael. who seems to have been from Missouri (“the Show-me State”) up to this point, now is the opposite extreme. He’d believe anything. Neither extreme is exactly what works in the type of disciple Jesus is seeking. But Nathanael now goes off teh deep end. He’s willing to accept anything. “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel.” That gives you a clue of what Nathanael thought the Messiah would be. A King of Israel in teh image of whom? The son of David. The Messiah was expected to be the son of David and, perhaps like Solomon, or David. Imagine, here is the one who is going to conquer the oppressor and maybe free our nation for ever. It’s the view that Nathanael apparently has!

John 1:50. “Jesus said, Now, Nathanael, just because I said to you that I had seen you, over a distance, under a fig tree, you have said all this? Believest thou? You haven’t seen anything yet!”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#7—Cobbey Crisler on John 3.27 (B11) +surrounding context verses:
In his conversation with Nicodemus (John 3:3), “Jesus makes this comment, unless a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” You know how popular that particular verse has become in our century. Yet it’s based on a misapprehension of the original word. We really don’t find John here using the Greek word “anothen” here in the sense of “again”. It can suggest the idea of “again.” But John uses it more in these terms, “from above."

"Anothen” means "from above." Now look at that statement that Jesus is making,

"Except a man be born from above, he cannot see the kingdom, or dominion, of God." This is a theological breakthrough that’s incalculable. You can’t see the kingdom, which, by the way, he told us was not only within, but here, right here. It wasn't a future far-off thing. "But to see it one must be born from above.” This is a definition of nativity which sounds totally impractical for us as human beings, and yet it's apparently something that Jesus based his whole theology upon. And he got the results from the concept that man is born from above…

…Then in John 3:13 he makes one of those magnificent statements that requires almost a lifetime search.

"No man hath ascended up to heaven." Isn't that what practically every religion puts in the heart of its communicants? Doesn't everybody want to get to a destination labeled heaven? "Ascended up to heaven," but no one gets there, except "he that came down from heaven.” The same thing, "That which is born of the Spirit is spirit," John 3:6. You can't get there via flesh.

“Apparently this critical awareness of man's nativity as God's child free from "blood, will of flesh, lust of the will of man," is not just a nice theory. Jesus is introducing it as the prerequisite for comprehending the kingdom of God and seeing it here and now. The son of Man sees it humanly, "No man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, even the son of Man which is in heaven.” Is it possible for humanhood to experience the kind of harmony on earth as it is in heaven? …Never moved. That claim, then, of heavenly nativity. It has to have something that is of major importance, John including it, and giving it so much space.”

In John 3:27, John the Baptist is confronted again. John, using communication terms, says, “A man can receive nothing, except it be given to him from heaven.” That’s almost the same concept in a way. Receptivity is what’s already been communicated to us. We’re not doing the communicating. We’re tuning in to what’s been communicated.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#8Cobbey Crisler on Matthew 14:14 (B12), plus surrounding context verses
that show Jesus’ compassion that enabled him to heal, feed 1,000s and walk on water:

Matthew 14: “(Verse 13, before the verse in the lesson). Jesus hearing that John the Baptist had been beheaded, decides to make himself scarce, leaves into a desert place apart.
(Verse 14). “But the multitudes followed him.” Instead of saying, “Look, will you let a man be alone for once,” he turned around with compassion and healed their sick.”
Verse 15-20). And out comes the famous loaves-and-fishes incident in which everyone is fed, with a balance left over despite the fact that we’re dealing with thousands of people. …
And, right after this (Verses 24-33) we have the walking-on-the-sea incident.”

“Book of Matthew, Auditung the Master: A Tax Collector’s Report,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#9—Ken Cooper’s poem offering this week he calls “The Breath of Spirit,” (B16).
It can be reached via
this link to the online version of Warren's PS additions by clicking on the DOWNLOADABLE PDF FILE in the UPPER RIGHT-HAND CORNER. Ken wrote about his linked contribution,I also give a link to the You tube site for those wishing or hear the poem spoken. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdLkmO9ADQ0

This gives the following comments: How often do we forget the simple truth that the man of God’s creating is the image of Spirit, and therefore must be and is spiritual? For God to be infinite, He/She must be Spirit, as Jesus declared to the woman of Samaria. His clarity of this fact led to instantaneous healings, which are even now being demonstrated when this truth is seen. When we feel the Spirit within, we experience the wholeness and freedom of Life as God's very reflection.

That’s good reason to sing!”


**You can buy your own transcripts of most of Cobbey Crisler’s 28 talks at a new website: www.crislerlibrary.co.uk Email your order or inquiry to office@crislerlibrary.co.uk, or directly to Janet Crisler, at janetcrisler7@gmail.com

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