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Here are Cobbey Crisler and other insights on some citations for

“Mortals and Immortals”
(the Christian Science Bible Lesson
for
May 20, 2018)

[Download “I AM THE PROOF” (of PERFECT IMMORTALITY!); it's an insightful poem by Ken Cooper (referring to the last citation in the Responsive Reading) by going to the online version and clicking on the file in upper right.
Ken writes of citation B6, "I have always loved the story of Caleb, and … agelessness . The thought of the bud and blossom co-existing in Mind is so relevant, – we don't have to wait to be what we are! https://sentinel.christianscience.com/issues/2015/4/117-17/the-rosebud ]

Warren’s (W’s) PS#1—Cobbey Crisler on Romans 8.19-21 (GT)
[Romans 8] In Verse 19 would you agree with Paul that “the earnest expectation of the whole human race is waiting for this manifestation of the sons of God”? That it could be manifested, this sense of glory?

Verse 21 mentions “the creature itself.” Look what is going to happen to the human body as the result of the evangelization of our mentality. As our mentality becomes more and more like God, the human body, “the creature itself, also shall be delivered.” There’s freedom, freedom from “every ill that flesh is heir to,” as Shakespeare says. “Delivered from the slavery,” literally in Greek, “the bondage of corruption,” “the slavery of decay into,” literally, “the freedom of the children of God.” The divine mode of being, as one dictionary says glory is, “into the freedom of the glory of the divine mode of being, of the divine nature, of the radiant thought of the children of God.”

If all our thoughts could be at the level of such radiance. We’ve seen light come out from a human expression. We’ve met people who radiate a sense of insight. That’s just simply “the ministration of death,” as Paul says [in 2 Corinthians 3.7]. That’s in the fleshly. That’s simply an outward manifestation of what’s going on within. More should be going on within. And we’re spending most of our time trying to dress the without.”
“Glory: Divine Nature in The Bible,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#2—Cobbey Crisler on II Corinthians 4.6-17 (RR)
Chapter 4, verse 6 of 2 Corinthians. Here is a commandment from God. This commandment was for “light to shine out of darkness,“ and to shine where? [Voice: “in our hearts.”]. Where is the finger of God at work? Where has Christ written his letter, his epistle? If that’s shining, if we’re facing God, face-to-face, Mind-to-Mind, if our mentality is taking on the likeness of God Himself, then that light is showing. But it’s a light that knows. It’s a mental light, “the light of the knowledge.” In the Latin Bible, do you know what that word is? It’s our word for science, scientiae. It is the light of the knowing in a sense of disciplined science “of the glory of God.”

We have the ability, therefore we are without excuse, to know God because he has revealed Himself, His nature, to us. We can call upon our divine nature. We can begin the answer the question, “What is natural?” with the response, “The divine is natural for me.” That “light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ Jesus” leaves not one slight dark spot of Adam’s amnesia left on the disc of our consciousness.

Verse 17 of Chapter 4 (of 2 Corinthians) stresses the meaning of the Hebrew word kabod, even though we’re in the Greek New Testament. Because it says “our light affliction.” Lightness here is the opposite of heaviness. “Our light affliction” we don’t consider our afflictions light, do we? I mean, our shoulders are bent over, and if only our relatives knew what we were assuming as burdens for them. Our relationships would be happier, if the United States tackling so much of the economic burden of the world, and the military burden. Are our shoulders bending nationally as well as under such weight? According to the Bible,this is “light affliction” and it s “for a moment,” and its going to work out for us “a far more exceeding [and] eternal weight of glory.”

Remember kabod means heaviness and weight. This weight suddenly turns out to be something that substantial. We’re talking about substance, the real weight. We’re not talking about an abstraction.

We’re talking about concrete being here in this “exceeding and eternal weight of glory” [2 Corinthians, Chapter 4, Verse 17]. Yet in Verse 18 we are told it’s not something you’re going to open your eyes and see. We have to cultivate the spiritual sense of appreciating what the physical sense do not tell us about.

Of what value, of what validity, of what reliability are our bodily senses if not one of can tell us there is a God? Because if God exists, as the Bible reveals He does, and we can see His effects appreciably in our lives, and none of the senses tell us that God exists, who needs the senses? They are not bearing witness to facts that exist, even though unseen.

We can’t bow down to our bodily senses as giving us correct information, can we? We know how deceived we are all the time. We also how how limited the senses are we know that some of our pet animals can detect things occurring through their senses that are completely unappreciable to ours. So why have we been so satisfied with the data coming to us from these five channels?”
“Glory: Divine Nature in The Bible,” by B. Cobbey Crisler** (just transcribed)


W’s PS#3—Cobbey Crisler on Isaiah 40.31 (B7)
Isaiah 40:31 is another prescription from the scriptures. “They that wait upon teh Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run and not be weary; [and] they shall walk and not faint.”
“Heal the Sick: A Scriptural Record,”
by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#4—Cobbey Crisler on Luke 7.19-22 (B10) Jesus’ measuring standard—works!
“Jesus responds in the next verses to John the Baptist’s question about whether Jesus really is the Messiah they were waiting for. There is only one answer Jesus has for John. Jesus doesn’t dictate the answer. He tells John the Baptists disciples to just go and look and conclude for themselves what they had seen and heard. Jesus had opened blind eyes, corrected lame limbs, cleansed lepers, enabled the deaf to hear perfectly, raised the dead, and preached the good news of victory to the poor. Then they were to take their observations back to John the Baptist.

That would be the only answer Jesus would give: his works. If that’s the only answer Jesus gave for the effectiveness of theology, I doubt that the rules have changed.

What would be the measure of effective theology to Jesus right here and now, if he looked around at every denomination on the face of the globe? Would they have to come up against that same merciless, yet really merciful, measurement? Are we producing? Are we solving problems?

In the twentieth (and twenty-first) century, problems seem to be multiplying faster than the loaves and fishes did. We have very little time. We can’t afford to waste time on anything that doesn’t work, especially religion.”
Luke the Researcher, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#5—Cobbey Crisler on John 8.32 (B11) The recipe for freedom!

“John 8:32. Here is the recipe for freedom, “It's the truth itself that makes you free." It is the fact that makes you free. In John 8:44, the devil is defined as a liar and also a murderer from the beginning. If you analyze that again, the devil has one of two purposes when it enters into the thoughts and lives of man. It is either to murder or to kill ourselves or others. That's the motive prompting the thought, critical or otherwise. Remember, judging righteous judgment eliminates most criticisms, and not judging according to appearance. It [lying “fake news”] either murders or kills our neighbor or ourselves, for its purpose is to deceive, one or the other.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#6—Cobbey Crisler’s insights on John 11:1-44 (B12) & Jesus raising Lazarus with gratitude-in-advance prayer.

In Chapter 11, note how Jesus handles news of a severe sickness.

In John 11:3, "Jesus gets a message from Lazarus' sisters that Lazarus is sick."

In John 11:4, the first thing Jesus says is, "This sickness is not unto death.”

Remember that's what he said about the man born blind in John 9:3, " Neither has this man sinned, nor his parents: but that the works of God might be manifest in him." We find the same kind of approach to a patient with Jesus' method of healing including that concept.

John 11:5, "He loved the family very much, the family of Bethany,”

John 11:6, "But he still remains for two days."

Then in John 11:7, he says, "Let us go into Judea again.”

John 11:8, "His disciples say, What? Last time we were there we had to duck projectiles. "

Then in John 11:11, he says to the disciples, “Our friend . . . (see the shepherd­motive) Lazarus sleepeth; but I go, that I may awake him out of sleep." There are two Greek words for sleeping here. The first one is as if taking rest in sleep. The second one, "awake him out of sleep," is the Greek word "exhyp,nos”. It includes within it the root of our word hypnotism. It has a suggestion of a trance-like, not­normally-induced sleep. It is interesting to see Jesus referring to death as a process of needing to be awakened from a trance.

John 11:12. His disciples misunderstand that whole thing and "they say, If he’s sleeping, leave him alone. He’s fine if he’s resting."

John 11:13 shows how Jesus was using what we would call a euphemism. He avoided the word die, because he is seeing it differently.

In John 11:14, when, "they don't comprehend him, he says very plainly, Lazarus is dead ."

John 11:16. Thomas doesn’t cover himself with glory every time he appears in the Scriptures. On the other hand, neither do we in our daily lives very often. I don't think we should finger-point at Thomas. But Thomas does have somewhat of a note of sarcasm here when he says to his fellow disciples, "Alright, let's go with him. Let's go die with him if he's going to Judea. " This was something he was not that willing to do when the opportunity arose. As you recall, when they captured Jesus in Gethsemane, where did Thomas head with all the rest of them?

John 11:17, "When Jesus arrives, we find that four days Lazarus had been in the tomb." He sees the scene that was so often associated with death, the hired mourners and the official mourners.

Martha appears in what I hope will always be a new light. We have a tendency to stereotype, even people we haven't known. Martha has been labeled for centuries, "Don't be a Martha." Some people are sorry their name is Martha, because of that.

In John 11:25, it is only to Martha that Jesus ever makes the statement, "I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live." Since we know that Jesus only addressed the receptive thought, and since Martha is the only one to whom he felt free to say, "I am the resurrection," it is somewhat of an honor to be named Martha from that point of view. …

John 11:33, "shows the weeping and the groaning that's going on."

John 11:35 is the shortest verse in the Bible. It indicates Jesus' humanity, "Jesus wept."

John 11:36, "Behold how he loved him!"

John 11:37, "They asked, Could this man have prevented this incident?"

John 11:38, "Jesus comes to the cave."

John 11:39, "And says, Take ye away the stone. At that point even Martha's faith breaks down. It's a hot country and a body in a tomb for four days and she so states."

John 11:40, "Jesus," supporting her continuing faith, "said, Didn't I tell you that if you would believe, you would see the glory of God?" Thereby he continued to support the resurrection trust in womanhood.

John 11:41, "They took away the stone. Jesus lifts up his eyes, and makes a pronouncement that what he desires through prayer has already been accomplished. I thank thee that thou hast heard me."

John 11:42, "And I knew that thou hearest me always. That's a remarkable statement of Jesus' theology.

Here's what the Anchor Bible says: "The prayer of petition is not the only form of prayer. If prayer is a form of union with God, then the Johannine (John's Gospel) Jesus is always praying, for he and the Father are one."

1 John 5:14 is another work attributed to the beloved disciple and one of the most beautiful views and definitions of prayer. It comes through the transparency of this thought that was so close to Jesus. Check your prayer against this measurement.

Here is the "Bureau of Standards" on prayer, "This is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask any thing according to his will, he heareth us." Notice the qualification. It is not according to our will. It is totally selfless.

1 John 5:15. But that's not all, "If we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have the petitions that we desired of him.” That's prayer of affirmation coming through there.

In John 11:42, isn't that exactly what Jesus said, "I know that thou hearest me always. If we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have the petitions. “It is important to examine how our prayers measure against that standard. We also find Jesus expressing gratitude before the event.

John 11:43. Then he says, “Lazarus, come forth." Obviously, he wouldn’t yell if he didn't think Lazarus could hear. You notice he's communicating with a so­called dead man, expecting him to be able to hear, using one of the faculties that was supposedly shut off. At the point of death, he doesn't regard it as shut off.

John 11:44, "Lazarus comes forth,” very awkwardly, I may add, but nothing could keep him from answering that demand. As a matter of fact, if you have been through the traditional tomb of Lazarus in Bethany, I consider it much more of a miracle that he ever emerged from the tomb, let alone being raised from the dead. I’m quite sure he would have bumped his head several times on his way out.

There's another part of the healing that’s necessary. "Jesus turns to those around him, “the environment, holding him in this grave, "and says, ‘Loose him, and let him go.'" There is a sense of freedom which is so important. Remember what he says to a woman in another gospel, Luke 13:12, "Woman, thou art loosed from thine infirmity.”

John 11:46, Guess what? With the marvelous raising of Lazarus from the dead, there are informers. Rather than spreading the good news, they have to go report. "They went their ways to the Pharisees, and told them what things Jesus had done."

John 11:47, "That's when they have a meeting about him."

John 11:54 “And Jesus can no more walk openly; but goes north into a wilderness,staying out of reach temporarily.

Chapter 12:1 begins where he revisits Bethany. t1.day

John 12:2, "Lazarus, Mary, and Martha there, Lazarus eating supper with them."

John 12:9 shows that, "a crowd begins to assemble. They hear that not only Jesus is there but Lazarus is a co-celeb. " Bethany is only about a mile and a quarter from Jerusalem, so all of Jerusalem has been aware of this raising of the dead in their vicinity. "So people are coming to see Lazarus.

In John 12:10, look at "what the chief priests are consulting about." Lazarus has just gotten out of the tomb and they want to stuff him back in! Because he was really walking evidence of God's word.

Here comes what's been called Palm Sunday and we find the general populace greeting him, even the children in other gospel accounts (Matthew 21:9, 15).

John 12:13, "Calling him the King of Israel, Hosanna," all Messianic terms, in recognition of Jesus' Messianic roles.

John 12:14, "When Jesus chooses a young ass to ride into Jerusalem." Dr. Bull makes an interesting point here, he says, "Nowhere else are we told in the gospel that Jesus rides anywhere. The presumption is that he walks. But here, very close to Jerusalem, where thewalk isn’t that long, he makes a point of having a special form of transportation. It so happens that, although I’ve not seen this in any book, we are faced with another Messianic symbol. When Solomon was anointed king, that’s teh way he came into Jerusalem, on the back of David’s mule. It also has to do with prophesy in Zechariah 9:9 where it talks about, “the king comes to Zion sitting on an ass’s colt.” The disciples don’t understand that until much later. …
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#7—Cobbey Crisler on John 8.51 (B15) & 8.58
In John 8:51 Jesus said, "If a man keeps my saying, he will never see death."

An unusual statement because certainly his disciples went on and saw the death process happening all around them. So once again, what does Jesus mean? What is the intent? What is the meaning? Dodd says it's such a strong statement that it really excludes the possibility of ceasing to live. That there is an eternality to it. How would you feel that was intended? "If a man keep my saying, he shall never see death."

Take the raising of Tabitha or Dorcas. Peter went in there. Everyone else around there saw death. Was it helping the situation? Did it solve the problem called death? Peter must have gone in there with a radically different point of view. And did it have a radically different result?

The statement in John 8:58 really started a popular commotion. Jesus says, "Before Abraham was, I am.” Does that fit into his statement about, "no man ascendeth up to heaven save he that has come down from heaven, even the son of man that is in heaven "? Is there a beginning for man, divinely speaking? Does it hold within it the key of eliminating the last enemy called death?”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


W’s PS#8—Cobbey Crisler on John 17: 1-4 (B16): Jesus’ prayer for himself having finished
In Chapter 17 of John's gospel, Jesus is praying audibly. If we've ever wanted to be present when Jesus is praying, it would be during this very moving prayer indeed. It's divided into three sections. To whom does the prayer, represented in the first five verses, refer? Himself. It's a prayer for himself Jesus did take time out for himself. This is just before Gethsemane. So you know what's in his thoughts.

John 17:1. It's in this prayer he says, “These words spake Jesus, and lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said, Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee.”

John 17:2, "As thou hast given him power over all flesh, that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him. "

John 17:3, "This is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent."

John 17:4. Imagine being able to say at the end of an earthly career, ''I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do." It would be wonderful if we could say that in any given day. But this is an entire career.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


You can buy your own transcripts of most of Cobbey’s 28 talks at a new website: www.crislerlibrary.co.uk Email your order or inquiry to office@crislerlibrary.co.uk, or directly to Janet Crisler, at janetcrisler7@gmail.com ]

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