Join us for the best summer yet!

A few select GEMs of Comfort for YOU today – and forever!

Including a Link to click on CedarS Met read by Christie
insights from Cobbey Crisler, Ken Cooper & others from the Christian Science Quarterly Bible Lesson on

“God the Only Cause and Creator”

May 31-June 6, 2021

shared by Warren Huff
CedarS Executive Director Emeritus warren@cedarscamps.org


W: Click this link to take you to today’s CedarS online Met with its audio link which you can see in the black bar as you scroll down  — with a glitch fixed.  Sorry for all my failed attempts to get it to you!


EXPERIENCE NO SIDE EFFECTS OR AFTER EFFECTS IN GOD’S HEALING & PREVENTATIVE (Responsive Reading) GEMS:
[Cobbey Crisler:] “Psalm Chapter 33, Verse 9, we’ve already alluded to.  The swiftness of God’s treatment.

It’s not a process, according to the Bible. It’s not recuperation.  It’s not convalescence, or gradual recovery. “He spake, and it was [done].”  In case we have had room in our thinking for a possibility of relapse, it is stated, “He commanded, and it stood fast.”  No side effects, no after effects.

In Psalm 33, Verse 11, “The advice or counsel of the LORD stands” for how long?  “For

ever.”   What good is that, if we aren’t there forever to receive such advice? “The thoughts of his

heart to all generations.”  What good are God’s thoughts unless those are the potions we are

supposed to be taking, imbibing, ingesting. God’s thoughts, His potions. Take them, eat them up, drink them in. That makes the Bible a pharmacopoeia which is a word the dictionary says

describes “preparations issued by official authority and recognized as a standard.”

[W: That’s what I call “BIG Pharma!”  It’s worthy of daily investing in with a “PROPHET” motive. (a “spiritual seer” inspirational motive of “the disappearance of material sense before the conscious facts of spiritual Truth.” (SH 593:4)] Pharmacopoeia, which is a word that in its ordinary meaning without

uplifting it to what the Bible would require of the term anew would just simply be an

authority to which one would turn to know where the remedies all are.”

Psalm 34:19. We have the therapeutic and the prophylactic. We have the healing and the preventive art. Many of the afflictions of the righteous: but the LORD delivereth him out of them all. ” That’s the therapeutic power of God. But it goes even a step further in Verse 20, “He keepeth all his bones. ” That means “He guards or protects all his bones not one of them is broken. ” [It] is the prophylactic, the preventive, power of God’s therapy.”
“Leaves of the Tree: Prescriptions from Psalms” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


START & STAY IN THE ABSOLUTE WITH AFFIRMATIONS & DENIALS! As John 1:1-3 (citation B1) and the “Scientific Statement of Being” also does on page 468 of Science & Health]
[Cobbey Crisler:] “In the beginning was the Word… without (the Word of God) “was not anything made that was made.”
“John 1:1. John starts off unlike any of the preceding gospels. “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” He starts off, as a matter of fact, as only one other book of the Bible begins. Notice Genesis 1:1: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. ” Do you think the early readers of his gospel would have recognized that? Do you think that was John’s intent? That it should be recognized?

“There is something that is a major clue to studying the Bible. That is, when you get the remotest hint of an Old Testament verse in the New Testament, don’t ignore it or put it aside.  It’s there for a very deep reason.  It probably holds the key to the meaning of the New Testament event, or the author would not have included it.  By no means make the mistake which Professor Davies, Professor Dodd, Professor Albright and many others of our top New Testament scholars say we often make.  That is, when you find a verse in the New Testament which comes from the Old Testament, either an exact quote or a paraphrase, don’t just go back to that verse.  Read the context around it.  Study the environment; get deeply involved in the thought and intent of the Old Testament passage.  You may be more closely at-one with what the author in the New Testament means.  In other words, what do you have?  You have a blend of the whole Bible that way.  You find that Old and New Testaments become inseparable, which is virtually the view, I think, that the authors of the New Testament take.  The account of the “Walk to Emmaus” in Luke 24: 13-35 shows how much Jesus and the apostles used the Old Testament to show how much the New Testament fulfills Old Testament prophecies.

“It also seems clear to me that Jesus, in his approach to mankind, from his outlook, his acts, his attitudes, his words as well as works, embraced universal humanity. You’ll find hints of it passed down from his early students to their students, and so forth. But more than this, Jesus of Nazareth was a Bible student to surpass all Bible students. Therefore, if he knew in his own thought when  an event  affecting him or others of his period  were the  fulfillment  of the Old Testament prophecy,  or  a lesson should be learned from a new/old truth that came out of the reservoir  of the  Scriptures, then he would so state it.

“But sometimes he allowed it to remain hidden.  It would force his hearers, as well as his readers in this century, to become Bible students with him if they wanted to understand what he was saying. He embraces universal humanity. He addresses and communicates particularly to Bible students. As far as Jesus’ comprehension of the word “Christian” is concerned, it probably would be fair to say that he would insist that Christians become Bible students just to comprehend what the word meant. What does that say to us today? Does that mean we should be reading these books, this collection, this library called the Bible?  Specifically, our focus today is on the New Testament and one of the gospels?  Should we be reading it as if it were a novel?  Is that how Jesus felt his life and mission should be conveyed?

“Should we weep real tears because of the suffering and the lack of understanding and the persecution that occurred to him? And then wipe our eyes and go about our business because we’ve read a very deeply moving story, as we might have turned on a televisions set? Is that the kind of surface research that Jesus expected of his followers? When he said in John 5:39, “search the Scriptures,” I doubt you could ever apply that to television.  Who wants to search television?  There is obviously an object in view which Jesus knew would not benefit him, but would be enormously rewarding. The yield on that kind of investment would leap out of the page into the lives of those who did it. Therefore, “the word would be made flesh,” (John 1:14).

“John 1:1 starts his gospel off, “In the beginning was the Word.” The Greek is, en arche hin ho logos. Does arche look familiar to you? It is the root word in “archeology.” It’s an exciting word. It doesn’t just mean when things begin or when they have started in a human way, so much as, translated by some scholars, as “the first principle” of things.

“For instance, when Jerome, in about 400 A.D. translates the Greek Bible into Latin, here’s how he does those opening words.  “In principio,” which, of course, is our root of our word “principle,” in principio. He could have used another Latin expression which is “ab initio, ” which would have meant at the initial phases of things, but instead he chooses a Latin word which has a dual meaning which  could  be  “principle,” the  first principle, the origin, the basis of things.

“If we choose that particular Greek meaning for the opening of both Genesis and John, then it gives it an entirely different connotation.  If, in principle, God created the heaven and the earth, or in principle, was the word, it starts out like many mathematical or scientific textbooks which start out with the statement of principle.  Everything else derives from it.

“But then we come to a word which John uses in the first chapter and uses again in successive chapters but never with the same connotation.  It stands out in its uniqueness and it is so emphatically important to the author that we have to just dwell on it somewhat and see what it might mean.

“Let me give you a partial history of the word. What automatically occurs to you as the meaning of logos? We take this word, “Word,” and identify it with logosThis is likely being written at some point during the 1st century A.D.  Way back in the 6th century B.C., Heraclitus at Ephesus was attempting philosophically to explain continuity amid all the flux around him. He resorted to logos as the eternal principle of order in the universe, the kind of reliable, unchanging law and order.  This is several centuries prior to John’s use of it.  (Interestingly enough, people think that the Gospel of John may have been written there.)

“From that period, we can trace the word logos through many, many different concepts. Zeno (of Elea, c 490 – c 430 B.C.), a Greek philosopher used it in the connotation of right reason, of reality within the mind, pure thought.  Which leads me to what Professor Dodd has said, “It is only in Greek that a term is available which means both thought and word, and that’s logos.” Only in Greek have you that term that can convey both thought and word. So, when you’re talking about logos, even from the standpoint of word, if we are not giving to it what really is behind it, we’re losing something of the message, aren’t we?

“Why does the additional concentration on thought add to the definition of word? When you go behind the word to the thought, you’re dealing with ideas, concepts, and the meaning. It is where all human languages finally give up their fragmentation and meet, and become one, in a Pentecostal day of infinite communication. The “word” is but an instrument which we must meet at the thought or at the meaning. Then, no barriers, especially language barriers, can stand between us and comprehension of one another, of the universe, its laws, and the source of those laws.

“Dodd continues: “In Origen’s commentary on the 4th gospel which is being written, again very early in the history of the Christian church. In reading Origen’s commentary, there are interpretations in there, in the Greek that he’s writing, which absolutely depend upon taking logos not only in the sense of word, but it alternates without warning with the other sense of rational principles. So, the continual indication of this word principle is something that is significant.”

“Do you know where we use logos in the English language? Biology, physiology. Logos is the one that has been used to define the sciences in the English language. This was the comprehension at least of the lexicographers who developed our own language of the Greek term. Look how it’s lasted even in our language. We use it all the time without realizing it, taking it for granted. Is there a scientific connotation, then, that “In the beginning,” “In the first principle of things,” there is a scientific unvarying, inalienable, order that’s ruling.  And that it’s not only being uttered as an expression or word, but behind it is the immense thought that also must be based on the same principle.  Notice in Verse 1of Chapter 1 that it all related with and to God.

“John 1:3 continues with a statement that is quite absolute, “All things were made by him, and without him was not any thing made that was made.” Is there any reservation for qualifications? “All things were made by him. That is [an] enormous commitment to make at the beginning of a book. The theology of this book is therefore committed right squarely on what principle if we’re now defining the theological principle on which the Bible is based? Not only oneness of God, but the fact He’s one, also means He’s all.  “All things were made by Him.” Everything is created by Him. That also poses problems, because all we have to do is open our eyes and look around us. And what we see, we’d rather not think was created by God. But as of now, we’ve just started the book. So, let’s see what the style of the author is and his theological commitments. “All things were made by Him.”

“He doesn’t leave it there. The very next sentence adds, “Without him was not any thing made that was made.” Why is he saying that? Doesn’t “all things were made by Him” take care of the other part?  What is the difference?  What’s the distinction that he is implanting in his readers’ thought right at the beginning of the book?  “All things were made by Him.” What would you call that? That kind of statement is an absolute, but is it also an affirmation.  It’s a real solid plus. This is a plus of the theological view of John.  “All things were made by Him.

“What have we got now?  Denial.  Here is how we’re going to deal with the minus element. The minus element is without Him, “without him was not any thing made that was made.” Any hint of a minus existing after the all-things-were-made-by­him being declared, is removed, because it is the other side of the same coin.

“The plus, the minus, the affirmation, the denial is a mathematical approach.  Dealing with the plus, dealing with the minus and ending up with one, not dualism.   One, so there’s no doubt that the key to the gospel is monotheism.  It challenges the reader’s thought to see if he’s there at that altitude before he continues any further in the gospel.  It forces the reader to get to that height in order to remotely commu

nicate with what’s in the gospel.”
“Book of John, A Walk with the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


WHOLEHEARTEDLY SEEK & SIFT to FIND GOD & YOUR “EXPECTED END”!
Sift plus & minus thoughts for “an expected end” of 100% precious peace, 0% vile division!
Cobbey Crisler on
Jeremiah 15:18 thru 31.3 (leading up to Jer. 32:15-41/citation B5):

Bonus Prelude: “Verse 18 in Jeremiah Chapter 15, “Why is my pain perpetual, and my wound incurable?”  Look at the prescription in Verse 19 “If you return, then will I bring thee again, [and] you will stand before me.”  Look at this for a mental sifting of plus and minus.  “If thou take forth the precious from the vile, thou shalt be as my mouth.”  How much do you and I reflect or image forth God’s mouth or words?  Remember what James [3.10] says, “Out of the same mouth proceedeth both blessing and cursing.  My brethren, these things ought not so to be.”  That’s what James wrote in his epistle.  Notice the control of thought and therefore, our communication here.  If we take forth the precious from the vile, we will be more like God now.  If we want the word to become flesh, we must conform to what that word is.  It’s indivisible.  It does not have part precious and part vile in it, nor should man.

17th Chapter of Jeremiah, Verse 14, “Heal me, O LORD, and I shall be healed.”  There’s Jeremiah’s prayer.  “Save me and I shall be saved.”  The Anchor Bible points out that the word “salvation” as used in the Old Testament is often used in terms of a not-guilty verdict in court.  Salvation is often used in the Old Testament in terms that we would understand today as a not-guilty verdict in court.

The salvation of man would eventually include a verdict of not-guilty, or innocent.  This is, of course, the entire theme of Job, his guilt or innocence.

Here is God being quoted, in Verse 12 Chapter 30 [of Jeremiah].  “Thus saith the LORD, thy bruise is incurable, and thy wound is grievous.  [Verse 13] “There is none to plead thy cause [of innocence], that thou mayest be bound up: thou hast no healing medicines.”

In Verse 15, “Why do you cry for your affliction? Your sorrow is incurable.”  Why? [Voice: “The multitude of your iniquity.”]  That’s all.  Just because of “the multitude of your iniquity.”  There is the Bible definition of an incurable disease.  It’s just up to us whether it’s incurable or not.  Our outlook, our comprehension, and what we are going to do about the iniquity aspect of it.  Moses was shown that man has just as much dominion over the serpent, symbolizing iniquity, as over the leprosy on his hand [symbolizing disease].      

Verse 17 is God’s view of whether there is any incurability or not.  “I will restore health unto thee, and I will heal thee of thy wounds.” 

Religion has got to be practical, especially in our century.  There’s no room for anything that’s not practical anymore.  There are too many problems requiring solutions.  Humanity in its history has run [from problems] long enough.  Like Jacob ran for twenty years until he began to wrestle [Genesis 32. 24, 25].  Collectively mankind is wrestling now.  As John Bunyan said about religion. “The soul of religion is the practical part.”

In Chapter 31, which is Jeremiah’s greatest chapter, he predicts the new covenant will come.  He defines it.  In Verse 3 he shows that the new covenant is definitely based on the comprehension of God as love. It’s that very “lovingkindness” that will draw all mankind to God for the solution of the world problems.”
“Heal the Sick”: A Scriptural Record, by B. Cobbey Crisler**


“TURN THE TABLES” ON ALL FABLES! BE UNWAVERING & NEVER FOOLED BY A FABLE FALSELY CLAIMING ANY “PERFECT GIFT FROM ABOVE” (cit. B6) COULD EVER DISAPPEAR!

Discover in your “wilderness” experience a “vestibule” entryway where all that disappears is a material sense (like bulky outer garments) of “loneliness, doubt, darkness” while “spiritual sense unfolds the great facts of existence.” (Science & Health, 597:16) In the sacred refuge and solitude of this wilderness, we find the constancy of perfect health, the confidence of spiritual light-heartedness and sufficiency…all of which can never be diminished or made to disappear!

[Cobbey Crisler on James 1:17 (cit. B6) and beyond thematically:
“Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variableness, neither shadow of turning—as in an eclipse”.
[Warren:] Christie Hanzlik, CS, in an earlier Met told of illusionist
David Copperfield’s trick to click here to see the whole audience slowly revolved to make the Statue of Liberty seem to disappear.   (“The audience wasn’t in on it. This was a real illusion. The audience was placed on a rotating platform and he slowly rotated it so no one would noticed. When the curtains dropped the audience was actually facing the other way. The whole set was designed so you wouldn’t know you were moving. The spotlights used to “pass through the empty space” was actually there to blind the audience should they turn around to where the actual statue was.“)]

[Cobbey again] “As promised in scriptures:
“God is not a man, that he should lie…hath he not said, and shall he not do it? Or hath he spoken and shall he not make it good?” (Numbers 23: 19}

And, “For I am the Lord; I change not.” (Malachi 3:6)

James 1:18 continues: “Of his own will begat he us with the word—logos—of truth, that we should be a kind of first fruits of his creatures”—a sample of what He created to be consecrated to Himself.”
[per Warren’s notes on Cobbey Crisler’s talk on “The Book of Job”]

… “We already know that James read Job because we read the verse (James 5:11) that mentions Job in it…
James 1:6 tells us how we should pray—[W’s 10/7/19 notes: pray like Job did who never wavered in proclaiming his spiritual innocence. Job so refined his powerful prayers of protest to God that he received his healing and “the Lord gave Job twice as much as he had before” (Job 42:10)].

[Cobbey:] “You’ll find when prayer is not prayer… “Let him ask in faith nothing wavering.” Wavering suggests this to-and-fro state of mind…
James 1:8 “A double-minded man is unstable in all his ways.”…

James 3:17 “But the wisdom that is from above” all stems from the commitment to oneness.”
“The Book of Job: A Mental Court Case” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


KNOW THAT YOUR “ABILITY & OPPORTUNITY ARE COORDINATE IDEAS” AND THEN “RISE TO THE OCCASION!” Application ideas by Warren Huff on citation S16, 571:16.

Know thyself, and God will supply the wisdom and the occasion for a victory over evil.” SH, 571:16

 “What occasions or opportunities are demanding your best these days?
1. Hard assignments, unbelievable work load and killer deadlines?
2. Important tests of our abilities or our faith and resilience?
3. A big game, presentation or performance?
4. Group Leadership role(s)?
5. An important date or social event?
6. A sticky situation where taking a moral or ethical stand and integrity are needed?
7. Challenging restrictions that keep testing your patience, equanimity and reliance on God?

 Whatever opportunities you face, you can meet them as their master by obeying this powerful two-word command.
Know thyself, and God will supply the wisdom and the occasion for a victory over evil.”
Science & Health, 571:16 (S18)

 “Know yourself as God knows you – as an ever-perfect expression of “infinity, freedom, harmony and boundless bliss.” (see S&H 481:3) Totally accept and simply express each of these elements of your divine identity to eradicate their illegitimate opposites.  Without a body-based sense of self, you will be open for God to eliminate from your experience: all of matter’s debilitating drag of limited energy, funds, intelligence, speed, inspiration; all its sapping slavery of restrictions (injuries, illness, red tape, tie-ups); all its regular rub of inharmonious relationships and its constant cloud of frustration and unhappiness.  All gone! These are all just fables that were never part of you or of those you love.

In the next couple of days, “your assignment, should you choose to accept it,” will be to simply do your part—know yourself spiritually—and watch God do Her part, to supply you with all the wisdom and occasions where victories are wanted.  You may also enjoy highlighting in every lesson all of God’s jobs in one color and all of yours in another color.

A friend shed new light on this passage with this one-line insight:
“ABILITY (the wisdom) and OPPORTUNITY (the occasion) are coordinate ideas.”

By accepting this divine law and knowing yourself spiritually, you will never have ability without being given opportunity to express it. (no unneeded bench-sitting) And, you’ll also never be given opportunities (like the seven listed at the top) without having the God-given abilities to rise to the occasion!”

Warren Huff originally posted this on CedarS website on December 5, 2002


FIND YOUR WAY TO THE FATHER – ONLY BY FOLLOWING THE MASTER!
[Cobbey:]
Chapter 14 of John begins with a discussion, a dialogue between Jesus and some of his disciples.

John 14:5, “Thomas asks about the way.”                                                                     

In John 14:6, Jesus responds, “I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh to the Father, but by me.

John 14:8. (CITATION b8) Philip says, “We’ll settle everything right now with you, Master, if you just shew us God,” a minor requirement. Imagine that this is going on the night of Gethsemane. With what Jesus has to look forward to, look at the questions he’s being asked!

John, the Beloved Disciple,” by B. Cobbey Crisler**


LOVE INTO VIEW YOUR DEFENSE ATTORNEY COMFORTER – AND EVEN GREATER WORKS! Cobbey Crisler on John 14:12-17 (cit. B17)
In John 14:12 Jesus makes a prophesy. He makes a prophesy in impersonal terms…

“There are greater works, the ultimatum of the application of what Jesus had introduced to earth. So, when he’s talking about greater works being done, through what agency will these greater works come? We find the Comforter is introduced.
John 14:16, “And I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter.”

We should know enough about prophesy and have enough respect to realize that most of the prophets in the Bible, including Jesus, had a tremendous regard for prophesy. They knew that it had come from God, not from man. Similarly, we should know how to recognize the Comforter when the Comforter arrives… 

 

The word “comforter” is parakletos, sometimes called paraclete…  translated “comforter” given by our King James Version. You will find, however, that The New English Bible does not use “comforter.” It uses “advocate.”  You’ll also find that I John uses parakletos and the King James translator of that uses “advocate.” 

 

We should know that the word “advocate” is a technical word legally. It specifically means “defense attorney.” That has a lot of implications to it.  By contrast the name “Satan” in Hebrew is a technical term for “prosecuting attorney.” There you have the battle joined in thought.

The Comforter is to come and defend man. We can see all the ways that Jesus had introduced various defenses for man…
John 14:16, “that he may abide with you for ever.” Is there a provision for a third revelation? The Comforter is apparently the final one.

John 14:17, “the Spirit of Truth.”  Notice how that counters Jesus’ definition of the “devil.”  What did he say about the truth?  It was the recipe for freedom (John 3:8).  So, it’s got something to do with that.  But there is also a communications problem.  The world “cannot receive.”  It’s not going to be a popular arrival.  “It doesn’t see him or know him.” 

But, we will know, “because it’s within.”

 

John 14:26 picks up the description.  “The Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost.”  There’s another part of the list, identified with the Holy Ghost in Luke 3:22, the dove descending is the symbol of it. The words “dove” and “ghost” are feminine in the Greek, and the comfort aspect also introduces the feminine concept.

 

The role of the Comforter “will be sent by God in my name.”   If one were to regard that literally, the Comforter’s name should at least have some recognizable aspect either relating to Jesus or to Christ.  Another aspect of the Comforter is “he will teach you all things.” 

The role of teaching what? Is anything left out?  “All things.”  And at the same time, “it will bring everything back to human memory that Jesus said.”     

“Book of John: A Walk with the Beloved Disciple”, by B. Cobbey Crisler**

Welcome the Comforter where there’s “Plenty of room for ‘greater works’… collective demonstrations…in governments… nations… that all could benefit from …the touch of the Comforter… ministries of divine Love”?
Christine Irby Williams on “greater works…” (cit. B17, John 14:12-16) (from a 12-29-13 Met)

“Jesus said… Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do; because I go unto my Father…” (cit. B17, John 14:12)

Christine Irby Williams nicely tackled the tough question of what works could possibly be greater than what Jesus did in a wonderful precamp inspirational talk to CedarS staff this May (2013) as well as in part of an inspirational address for the Christian Science Nurses conference at CedarS this September (2013). [CedarS was delighted to again be hosting over 120 CS Nurses from all over the world during the first week of September 2019.]

In 2013 Chris essentially said, in part: Have you ever wondered what in the world Jesus meant by greater works?  It does sound a little daunting.  We read almost every week in the Bible Lesson something such as Jesus “went about…healing ALL manner of sickness and ALL manner of disease among the people.”  He fed 5,000 men plus women and children with what had appeared to everyone else as a few loaves and fishes.  He walked on water and suspended time and space.  He raised to life a child who appeared to have just passed away, a young man who was on his way to be buried, and Lazarus, who had been in the grave four days already.  And then, of course, he raised himself after the crucifixion, and he ascended. So, what could possibly be greater than any, much less all, of that?  I’ve often wondered, and I’m still pondering his promise…

 

There has been one particular area in which it’s likely that we’ve all been aware that there is plenty of room for “greater works,” and that is working together, or what might be called collective demonstration: in families, church work, any kind of organizational work—in a church context or otherwise, in neighborhoods, in governments of all sizes, in nations, among the people, and in the world at large.  Would you agree with me that these are areas that could benefit from the light of Truth, the touch of the Comforter—the healing and saving ministries of divine Love? Might we be so bold as to think about tackling the environment? World peace? World hunger?  If not, why not?  If so, let’s get on with it!  Let us “then up and be doing,” as our hymn [#18] says!” Christine shared more inspiration on this and other topics at the 2012 Fern Lodge Annual Meeting.

First posted in Warren’s Met on “Christian Science” for 12-29-13

American Camp Association

MAIN OFFICE
(November - May)
410 Sovereign Court #8
Ballwin, MO 63011
(636) 394-6162

CAMP OFFICE
(Memorial Day Weekend - October)
19772 Sugar Dr.
Lebanon, MO 65536
(417) 532-6699

Support our mission!

CedarS Camps

Back
to top